Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

MENU

Does Your Child Have School Phobia?

school work

School Phobia?

We’ve all heard of kids who beg to stay home from school, but apparently, some kids are truly phobic of school.

According to CBS News’ “Early Show,” about 5% of kids suffer from a real clinical condition known as school phobia, school refusal or didaskaleinophobia.

Not surprisingly, school phobia generally occurs during times of transition such as entering a new school, according to “Early Show” contributor, psychologist Dr. Jennifer Hartstein.

But how do you differentiate between a kid who doesn’t like school and a child who is school phobic?

There are some clear symptoms of school phobia. Your child might feel tired and nauseated. They may have headaches or fainting spells. They might have diarrhea or vomit.

Hartstein says one of the main causes for school phobia is fear of failure. Therefore, perfectionists tend to suffer from school phobia more than other kids. School phobia could also be prompted by a family trauma or recent life transition.

How do you know if your child has school refusal or just wants to stay home and play? If your child is throwing up at the thought of school, chances are good that something is really wrong. 

Hartstein suggests asking open-ended questions as a way to get to the root of the problem. You might need to talk with the school, your child’s teacher or a guidance counselor or therapist.

Do you think your child has school phobia?

More posts:

Dad Threatens Bullies. What Would You Do?

Six-year-old Cheerleader Cut from Team Due to Lewd Cheer

100 Best Companies for Working Mothers

5 Ways to Unspoil Your Child Fast

Why are Couples with Daughters More Likely to Divorce?

Should Dads Take Paternity Leave?

Do Working Moms Take Advantage of Work-at-Home-Moms?

Should Bars Refuse to Serve Pregnant Women?

photo: flickr/sokabs

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as:

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest