Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Should Schools Stop Wigging Out About Hair?

dennisreynoldsThe jury’s still out on whether a Staten Island kid got kicked out of school for showing up with half his head shaved or whether his mom yanked him out school. But does half a head of hair really make any difference?

Over at ParentDish, they’re reporting that the school says they called Dennis Reynolds’ mom to make sure she knew her son was missing half his ‘do. She says she knew and figured it was better that then wearing his pants hanging down below his underwear. Somehow, Dennis ended up leaving the school that day – despite a big state test. Mom says the school went off half-cocked and sent him home. School says she wanted him home.

But I’ve got to get back to my big question here: who the heck cares about a kid’s hair that much? Newsflash – it grows back.

Schools tend to get up in arms about unusual hair styles because they say they’re distracting to other students. As a girl who shaved her head senior year of high school, I can tell you firsthand, they’re right. For about five minutes.

In a tiny high school, there wasn’t one person (teachers included) who didn’t have something smart to say about my hair – or lack thereof – the day I arrived on campus bald as a cueball. But as soon as the teachers pulled out their chalk, the classes settled down and we go to work. Really. One kid, one bad hairdo, do not have nearly the affect that administrators credit them with. Frankly, neither does one pierced nose or ratty pair of jeans, but that’s another story.

If Reynolds’ mom is truly looking at this from the “it’s better than . . . ” standpoint, kudos to her. My parents’ forbade me from getting my head shaved, but once it was done, they shrugged and moved on. Because it would grow back. Because they knew where I was – and it wasn’t shooting crack in an alleyway. So I was bald. So what?

And so I say to school administrators: it’s just hair, so what? What would you rather kids experiment with?

Image: silive

Related Posts:

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , , , , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest