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Sibling Similarities are Cleverly Featured in Photographer’s ‘Base Pairs’ Portrait Series

Andrew Ryan, a Gyeonggii-do, South Korea-based Canadian photographer, grew up as an only child, which he says made him a “natural” to study the likenesses of those who were raised with siblings.

According to Peta Pixel, in Ryan’s series “Base Pairs, he “shot portraits of a number of siblings using black-and-white film. He then developed the film, scanned the negatives into his computer, and spliced them together digitally to create each final composite image.”

It’s an analog approach that highlights no matter how different we think we might be on the inside, siblings can still be strikingly similar on the outside.

Take a look:

  • Base Pairs 1 of 6
    cover13

    Photos by Andrew Ryan

  • Alexa & Tayah 2 of 6
    118

    "Base Pairs stems from two separate ideas which, together, seem more concrete than apart," Andrew Ryan said. "Some of my previous work has focused on eliminating and blurring the boundaries between digital and analogue photography."

  • Grace & Tony 3 of 6
    43

    "Base Pairs takes the idea of a digital composite image (a technique prominent specifically in commercial applications) and overtly applies it to black and white film," according to Ryan.

  • Ron & Dave 4 of 6
    34

    "The genetic aspect of the work derives from my own experience as an only child," Ryan said.

  • Rachel & Christine 5 of 6
    28

    "Having an obviously limited gene pool," Ryan said, "it has been natural for me to analyze the likeness of various siblings to each other."

  • Brittany & Izilda 6 of 6
    51

    For more of Andrew Ryan's work, visit his website.

 

All photos used with permission from Andrew Ryan

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