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Sleep Bag Can Help Reduce SIDS Risk — Win Some!

sleeping_baby1In light of a new study that may have uncovered a link between low serotonin and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, parents of young babies have been reminded again of some of the things they can do to reduce their baby’s risk. Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Boston found that babies who died of SIDS had lower serotonin levels in their brain tissue than those that died of other causes, and theorize that perhaps these lower levels plus stress to the system mean those babies cannot survive what other babies might.

One of the major things parents can do to minimize their baby’s risk of SIDS, beyond putting them on their backs to sleep, is to make sure they are not overheated. Trust me, I had winter babies (temps were in the single digits the entire month of my son’s birth) and so I really understand the delicate dance between wanting to ensure they are warm enough and not overdressing them, but overdressing and/or cranking up the heat is a major risk factor for SIDS, and so is covering a baby with heavy blankets.

Enter those warm snuggly bags that look like a cross between a jumper and a sleeping bag. It serves as a blanket that the baby can’t kick off and will not end up over their face. We used ours constantly. And hey look, Droolicious, our fabulous product review blog, is giving away a great version by aden + anais. They were invented by a pair of Aussie mothers who couldn’t find anything like the muslin baby buntings they had had at home here in the US. So they created them, in a bunch of nifty modern patterns.

Interestingly, aden + anais sponsors the CJ Foundation for SIDS, which supports the work of a researcher in the lab that did the groundbreaking serotonin study and is looking at possible genetic variations of risk for SIDS. Talk about helping babies, all around.

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