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So, What's the Deal With Flag Day? Here is What You Need to Know

What's the Deal With Flag Day?

June 14th just isn’t the day after June 13th and the day before June 15th, it is also Flag Day, an underrated and often forgotten holiday.

Now, many people don’t celebrate Flag Day these days. But why not? It’s a perfect excuse to make a flag shaped cake, take the day off of work (although not many employers would understand your celebration of the day), and/or give the kids yet another teachable moment.

So, what is the deal with Flag Day? Here is a quick and simple history lesson about the day for you and the kids.Many nations celebrate their own version of Flag Day, each one paying tribute to their own national history and official flag. In the United States we commemorate the day in which U.S flag was adopted which occurred on June 14th, 1777.

Flag Day didn’t actually become ‘official’ until August 1949 when President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed it our Flag Day. But there are reports that Flag Day was observed in different ways starting way back in 1861.

So what does one do on Flag Day? To observe, patriotic citizens (and all government buildings) should fly the American Flag all week long. But besides that, there aren’t many perks that come with Flag Day – federal offices, banks and the mail is still delivered on Flag Day. But a few towns hold parades to celebrate the day. There is even a National Flag Day Foundation that takes the day – actually the whole week – pretty seriously.

As for you and your kids? You can download some flag coloring pages right here for some between the line fun or that Flag Cake I mentioned earlier is a good one, ‘cos any day is a cake day, and Flag Day it’s a great excuse for dessert you can try Ina Garten’s Flag Cake recipe here).

Patriotic Crafts: Year-round kids projects to show off their pride!

 

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