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Soldier Forced to Prove Paternity to Get His Family to the US

soldier

Cheyne Parham, a US Army Captain, fell in love while stationed in Korea. He married Mary Joy, a Philippine citizen, and they had twin daughters in August 2008. But he’s only seen his children for a fraction of their young lives, because the American Consulate in Manila won’t issue passports to his family, and visas to enter the US.

Perham told CNN that the consulate has forced him to convince them that the children are actually his. Speaking with KBTS, in College Station Texas,  Perham said that, “The Consulate said, ‘I’m just not 100 percent convinced you were exclusive at the time of conception.’ Now she based that statement off my wife working at a bar in Korea.”

Parham supplied the consulate with birth certificates, a marriage certificate, insurance forms, and a court ruling validating his paternity. The consulate was unmoved. Finally, he took a DNA test, showing him to be the father.

The Departement of State, however, is not accepting that test, and is requiring him to take still another DNA test conducted by the consulate, which would only extend his separation from his wife and kids.

Parham’s family cannot even come to the US as visitors, since the investigation to prove Parham’s paternity is an open case with the State Department.

The family has turned to the courts without luck. A federal court dismissed Parham’s case without addressing his paternity, simply agreeing with the State Department’s argument that Parham still had other official avenues available. He is appealing the ruling.

“I have a responsibility to every other service member who has been through this, and that will be in this situation. Because if I don’t fight then the wrong will just happen again,” Parham said.

Source: KBTX

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