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Stay At Home Dads Get No Respect In The Office

With the economic crunch pinching families everywhere, a lot of stay at home parents have taken the plunge back into paying work. The road from baby meet-ups to board meetings is especially challenging for stay-at-home dads, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Stay at home moms outnumber their male counterparts 5 to 1, and even ladies have a tough time getting back into the work force after a stint of full-time parenting. For dads who took time off to raise their babies, the stigma is even greater.

Many of the stay-at-home parents I know have used their years at home to gradually build up a home-based business. That works for some careers, and some people. It can often be a neat side-step to the awful moment of sitting down in a job interview across from someone who’s looking over your resume and seeing “parenting” as your most recent position.

If you do need to go back into the corporate world, here are some tips the Wall Street Journal offered up for dads. I’m betting they’d work just as well for moms.

  • Keep a foot in the door. If you can, pick up some freelance projects or weekend hours doing a little of the work you enjoy. Then when you’re ready to dive back in full-time, you’ll have some recent work experience and references to draw on.
  • Stay focused on your job skills. Talk briefly about being a full-time parent, and then get the conversation focused on your work experience in the field. Don’t let the interview become all about your kids.
  • Network, network, network. Go to professional events, mention your career at cocktail parties, get your name out there.
  • Consider a career change. This might be the perfect time to go get that master’s degree and change fields.

Have you recently reentered the workforce? Got any hot tips on how it’s done?

Photo: Pedro Cancion

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