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Store Won't Sell Alcohol to Dad Because Daughter's Present

pinacoladaA new policy at a number of British grocery store could force parents to carry ID whenever they want to buy alcohol – ID for their kids that is.

The Brits are upping their efforts not to sell alcohol to minors, but it’s pissing off the parents who say they want to be able to walk into a store with their kids and simply buy a bottle of wine.

And the grocery stores? They think parents should be grateful.

Apparently, they’ve never had to figure out how to shop without their kids – or rustle up ID for a child who isn’t yet driving!

The idea is that adults buying with kids in tow might be contributing to the delinquency of a minor – supplying alcohol for their young charge. If the second person can provide proof they’re old enough to buy, the onus is off the shopkeeper.

But what about the kids who are being required to show ID when it’s a parent buying? I suppose if the last names match, storeowners will feel safe leaving the alcohol decision in a parent’s hands – but what about the thousands of kids whose last names don’t match their parent’s?

And what of the grandparents who take a grandchild into a store, the aunts, the uncles, the family friends? They’re adults – should buying booze really be something they can only do when children aren’t present?

As a parent, I suppose I should be grateful they aren’t selling booze to my underage kid – but if I put my child in the trust of another adult, I trust them enough to allow them to buy alcohol with my child. If I thought they’d be getting my child drunk or driving drunk with my child, I would do well to keep them away from my child!

Do you think this is fair to parents?

Image: Wikimedia

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