Study Finds That Babies Need More Vitamin D

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combo-hat-and-glasses-2tMother’s milk is the ultimate super-food, containing just about everything a baby needs–except Vitamin D.  Why?  Humans originated along the equator and abundant sunshine originally provided infants with all of the bone-fortifying vitamin they required.  Modern-day bambinos, however, could use a little help.  According to a Pediatrics study,  5% to 37% of infants require a supplement to meet the American Academy of Pediatrics standard for Vitamin D:  400 international units a day.

Bottle-fed babies don’t fare any better.  In order to hit that 400-unit mark, an infant would have to imbibe 32 ounces of fortified formula a day, an amount that tummies under 6-months-old just can’t handle.

The bad news:  our greatest source of vitamin D, the sun, is a no-no.  The A.A.P. recommends zero sunlight in baby’s first six months to help prevent cancer and skin damage.   Sunbathing is still prohibited from seven months on:  sunscreen, hats and protective covering are prescribed by every doctor.

The good news:  the supplement is available in drop form and is inexpensive.  Just ask your pediatrician.

Check out more on babies and their vitamin needs here.

Image:  babybanz

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