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Suspected German Terrorist Names Son "Jihad"

reda-seyamThere are names and there are names. And this one is a doozy.

A man described as an “Islamist” who’s been watched closely by intelligence agencies for years has gained permission from the German courts to name his son “Jihad” – or more precisely, Djehad, another form of the Arabic word for “struggle.”

It’s a word we Westerners mostly link to terrorist activities. Considering this doting dad, Reda Seyam, tops a list of suspects in the Bali bombings of 2002 (sometimes called Australia’s September 11th), it’s a safe bet that the family is zeroing in on that use of the term as well.

German residents are freaking – as are some Americans. Check this comment on a blog post from 2007, when Seyam was still in the midst of his battle to officially name the boy: Germany needs to start mass deportations again – this time with the Muslims.

Ouch!

I won’t disagree that the name seems ill-advised. Has anyone checked in with the American family who opted to grace their kids with Nazi names and lost the children to protective custody late last year?  As many people pointed out when Heath and Deborah Campbell opted to name their kids Adolf Hitler and JoyceLynn Aryan Nation, the names are clearly going to set the kids up for a heap of trouble down the road. It doesn’t necessarily mean the parents are abusive, however. And people with some pretty awful names have managed to grow up and become productive members of society (Moon Unit Zappa, anyone?).

More alarming than the name is the fact that a guy considered a fanatic, known for “railing against human rights” (per the Telegraph) is procreating. And when approached by TV cameras, this is his response:

Even if he named his son Jimmy or Teddy, he would not be sweet and cuddly.

What do you think? Is Jihad an OK name for a child?

Image: Local.de

Also on Babble:

Baby Names Gone Wild: Toeing the Line Between Crackpot and Creative

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