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Take A Deep Breath: Maybe The Casey Anthony Verdict Wasn't Wrong

Was justice served in Casey Anthony trial?

You’re going to hate me for saying this, but someone has to. Maybe – just maybe – Casey Anthony didn’t kill her daughter. Maybe Anthony was found not guilty of murder charges today because the jury knows something we don’t.

I’m not saying I think Casey is innocent, or a good person. I’m just saying we can’t know. No one but Casey knows for sure whether or not she killed her daughter, and none of us know what exactly prompted the jury to acquit her.

The verdict is shocking, of course. It never even crossed my mind that she wouldn’t be found guilty in this case. But she was, and I’m left wondering how the case looked so different to the jurors than it did to those of us following along on the sidelines.

There are factors beyond Anthony’s guilt or innocence that might have influenced the jury. Juries are hesitant when the death penalty is involved. The notion of “reasonable doubt” combined with the fact that you have a person’s life hanging in your hands can make jurors very hesitant to convict.

It also seems like the prosecution’s case wasn’t as strong as it first seemed. According to the New York Times:

The verdict vindicates the defense, which argued from the start that Caylee drowned accidentally in the family swimming pool and that the death was concealed by her panicked grandfather, George Anthony, and Ms. Anthony.

It also drove home just how circumstantial the prosecution’s case proved to be. Forensic evidence was tenuous and no witnesses ever tied Ms. Anthony to Caylee’s murder. Investigators found no trace of DNA or solid signs of chloroform or decomposition inside the trunk of Ms. Anthony’s car, where prosecutors said Ms. Anthony stashed Caylee before disposing of her body.

The prosecution was also hurt by the fact that nobody knows exactly how Caylee died; her body was too badly decomposed to pinpoint cause of death.

This makes it sound like the prosecution had a hard time proving their case, whether or not they were right. Maybe Caylee’s mom callously murdered her and is walking away due to inept bungling on the part of the police and/or justice system. Or maybe they didn’t really have a case.

What do you think? Is this a miscarriage of justice, or might the jury know something we don’t?

Photo: walknboston

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