Previous Post Next Post

Mom

Brought to you by

The History of the Internet

By Molly Thornberg |

internets historyHave you ever looked into the history of the internet? While this world wide web thing is now apart of our everyday lives, it’s hard to think that just 30 something years ago, it didn’t even exist.

How long have you been online? Were you chatting on CompuService or AOL? Let’s give a look at how the internet came to be what we know it today.

The History of the Internet

When the internet was started and how it’s evolved over the years.

History of the Internet

1962: J.C. R. Licklider introduced the idea of an “Intergalactic Network.”

1974: Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn used the term “Internet” in a Transmission Protocol paper.

1976: Dr. Robert Metcalfe invented ethernet, coaxial cables that quickly transported data.

1978: Gary Thuerk sent the first spam email to 400 users of ARPANET advertising his DEC’s new range of minicomputers.

1983: One January 1, 1983, every machine connected to ARPANET was required to use TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol and Internet Protocol). This became the core of the internet.

1984: Dr. Jon Postel described his idea for .com, .org, .gov, .edu, and .mil in a series of papers published by the Internet Engineering Task Force.

1985: Dennis Jennings joined the National Science Foundation and determines that TCP/IP should be mandatory for the entire NSFNET program.

1987: CompuServe accidentally released  the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) image not knowing there was a patent pending on the technology.

1989: The World, an Internet Service Provider (ISP), offered the first commercial dial-up internet.

1992: Corporation for Research and Educational Networking (CREN) released the World Wide Web.

1993: Marc Andreessen, NCSA, and the University of Illinois developed “Mosaic for X,” a graphical interface for the World Wide Web. Mosaic was the first widely used internet browser.

1994: Pizza Hut offered online ordering through their website.

1995: Pierre Omidyar released AuctionWeb, which later became eBay.

1998: Google receives funding from Andy Bechtolsheim (Sun Microsystems) becoming Google Technology Incorporated.

1999: Wi-Fi, wireless internet technology is standardized. Sean Fanning created and released his infamous Napster. He was 18.

2000: The Dot-com bubble burst falling drastically after peaking at 5,048.62 on the NASDAQ.

2001: Wikipedia is launched eventually changing domains from .com to .org.

2003: Apple launched the iTunes Stores with only 200,000 songs. Within 24 hours, they’d sold a quarter of a million songs.

2004: On April 1, 2004, Google announced the launch of Gmail, which would offer 1GB of storage.  Because Hotmail and Yahoo were only offering 2MB and 4MB respectively some people thought it was an April Fool’s joke.

2005: YouTube is launched revolutionizing web-based video. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.6 billion.

2006: Dom Sagolla released Twitter. Facebook, once exclusive to college students is made available to everyone.

2009: Mobile data traffic exceeded voice traffic every single month.

image source: onlineschools.org

What’s Next?

Molly blogs technology, parenting and geekery at Digital Mom Blog.

More Babbles

Follow Molly on Facebook, Pinterest or Twitter.

Follow Me on Pinterest

More on Babble

About Molly Thornberg

digitalmom

Molly Thornberg

Molly Thornberg is a wife and mother of four. She worked in web design and social media marketing before quitting to pursue blogging full time. On Digital Mom Blog, Molly shares "geeky" DIY projects, discusses the latest technology news, and talks about her life as a parent. Read bio and latest posts → Read Molly's latest posts →

« Go back to Mom

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Comments, together with personal information accompanying them, may be used on Babble.com and other Babble media platforms. Learn More.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *.

Previous Post Next Post