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The Most Ridiculous Ban of the Year Has Just Been Implemented: High Fives

Kids high fiving

Noooooooooo! Don’t do it!

When my older daughter was just a toddler, we enrolled in tot music program. On the first day of the fall session, another mom raised her hand and asked the teacher to prohibit all participants from making any noises with their lips using their fingers in an effort to reduce the spread of germs.

It wasn’t a horrific idea in theory. Except you can tell a toddler anything you want, but the chances of them actually listening and do what you say are pretty much nil. Plus, we’re talking about a music class full of instruments, which look as tasty as food to a toddler, if not a wee bit more so.

The mother ultimately lost and I don’t remember seeing her in another music class after that session ended.

A soccer club in Manhattan is understandably concerned about this winter’s flu epidemic that could end up killing close to 50,000 people before all is said and done. So in an effort to prevent the virus from spreading among their players they’ve decided that “‘the safest thing to do is to touch elbows’ during the traditional lineup for team high-fives,” according to the New York Post.

Parents of the team members reportedly approved of the “precautionary measure.”

While every parent wants their kids to stay safe, the best way to do that is to get the flu shot, wash hands frequently and stay home if there are any signs of illness.

I’m a pretty classic germaphobe, but not one so bad that I can’t, say, take my kids to music class or let them play soccer. I wonder if these same parents are letting their kids play sports that actually involve the hands — such as basketball, volleyball or baseball?

Photo credit: iStock

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