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The New Bad Boy on the BPA Block

gaiam-water-bottleIf you were one of the parents who went racing around for a new BPA-free alternative after the big Sigg announcement this summer, sit down. We’ve got another one for you – and this is a doozy.

Z Recommends – who initially broke the story of how bogus Sigg’s BPA-free claims were – has a new story of water bottles gone bad that makes Sigg’s look like they’re candy coated.

The blog posting this week notes Gaiam – known as the go-to for yoga gear – “quietly added information to its retail website which admits to independent lab test results showing leaching levels at 23.8 parts per billion.”

That’s twenty TIMES the amount of BPA that was found in the Sigg bottles. And, yes, these were bottles being marketed as “BPA-free.”

Among those still being marked as BPA-free, the company has added this disclaimer: “We also took additional steps to help ensure your safety via independent laboratory tests that go well beyond FDA requirements. An independent lab subjected our aluminum water bottles to continuous extreme heat — nearly 200 degrees Fahrenheit — in an environmental chamber for three days while the bottles were filled with water. Under these extreme conditions, a trace amount of BPA (23.8 parts per billion) was detected in the water inside the bottle.”

Trace amounts, huh? Does that sound like it’s BPA FREE?

Studies have linked BPA to everything from cancer and obesity to problems with brain function and mood disorders. And recently the stories of BPA issues have been mounting. The latest? Kids don’t need to even ingest it themselves – a pregnant woman (maybe one doing prenatal yoga – ahem) who intakes BPA may be creating aggression in her kids.

I gave birth just four years ago, and the amount of information on BPA has seemed to quadruple in that time. So too have the number of companies marketing “BPA-free” products . . . and those whose claims are falling flat.

Do you look for the BPA-free label? Do you trust it?

Image: Amazon

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