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The Pros And Cons of Speed

No, not THAT kind of speed… although there are some days that I daydream about what I could accomplish if I were amped up on something!

Speed as in VELOCITY.

Speed shapes our digital world: If you want something to catch on in social, it has to be quick and easy, and should not take any longer than it takes to Tweet, Pin, or Post.

If you want people back on your blog, write for the web — short, scannable posts because we have the collective attention span of a gnat.

For many mom bloggers — ahem, me — the speed enabled by technology has what’s made this livelihood possible… because everything can fit into the slim kid-free chunks of time we have: blog posts, product reviews, videos, slide shows, and quick bursts of online engagement.

But what is the price we pay when everything happens so fast? In my experience, speed means we cover lots of ground but can’t go very deep and sometimes it means we actually have to go over the same ground twice. Speed means its tough to build true consensus because who can wait for that?! Speed means that the gap between thought and action is zero.

I’m the worst offender of all. My partners have often commented that we can have an idea one day and it’s up on the site the next day! Like magic!

It’s actually not so magical. Sometimes, it’s just dumb. The other day, I raced through the grocery store to pick up a couple of things. But since I didn’t want to spend the time to stop and make a list, I ended up zigzagging up and down the same aisles over and over remembering what I needed. I’m certain that I saved no time whatsoever this way and my method cost me added aggravation.

It was on my drive home that day that I realized that one of the learned skills that has been brought to my attention repeatedly in the last few weeks is how to STOP. I’ve been learning it through dancing, through parenting, from the flu, and from my therapist! :)

I’m learning the benefits of stopping — not permanently or even for very long but to create a momentary pause in whatever it is I’m doing, just long enough for the possibility of something else, an actual intention or objective to become clear to me, just long enough for an idea to complete itself.

I know it’s really, really tough to trade the immediate gratification of a long list of to-do’s checked off. But over the last year, I’ve found that although my lists of projects is nowhere near as long, the ones I’ve completed and/or are involved in are more successful, more lasting, and more meaningful.

Where can you stand to insert some pauses in your day? Wait. Before. You. Answer.

photo credit: stock xchng

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