Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

MENU

They Say: Kids Who Snarf Candy Become Violent Adults

candy-makes-kids-meanPerhaps you’ll want to rethink Halloween.

British researchers have found a link between eating candy as a kid and being violent as adults. A new study in the British Journal of Psychiatry’s October issue claims that kids who eat too much candy are more likely to be arrested for violence when they grow up.

The findings are based on research that followed more than 17,000 subjects born in 1970 for over four decades. Sixty-nine percent of the kids who at candy or chocolate everyday at age 10 had been arrested for violence by the age of 39. For those who hadn’t been in violent clashes, only 42 percent ate sweets daily.

Now, nobody’s claiming the candy made them do it. But here’s how some are initially interpreting the findings [MSNBC]:

“It’s not that the sweets themselves are bad, it’s more about interpreting how kids make decisions,” said Simon Moore of the University of Cardiff, one of the paper’s authors.

Moore said parents who consistently bribe their children into good behavior with candies and chocolates could be doing harm. That might prevent kids from learning how to defer gratification, leading to impulsive behavior and violence.

Even after controlling for variables like parenting skills and social and economic backgrounds, researchers say the candy-gorging and violence link was strong.

Perhaps their rotting teeth made them act out? Candy … everyday? Ahhhh, the ’70s.

More Posts

Girls Do More Chores Than Boys

Plea for Soft Fake Breasts

Homeschooled Kids Smart. School-Schooled Kids Nice.

Post-Partum Depression Totally Predictable

Expert: Instead of Timeouts, Just Say ‘Yes’

Levar Burton Relieved Reading Rainbow was Canceled

Kraft Cleans Up Mac ‘N’ Cheese — in Europe Only

Shaken Baby Syndrome Impossible?

They Say: Some Formula Makes Kids Smarter!

Preschool Search Nightmare Already Begun

Photo: sfgate.com

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest