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They Say: Staples Pose Risk Post C-Section

stitches-not-staples-c-sectionA new study has led researchers to recommend: stitches, not staples, after a ceasarean section.

Women in the study were less likely to suffer post-surgery complications if doctors used sutures to close up the uterus, muscle tissue and skin.

The study, conducted by the Lehigh Valley Health Network in Allentown, Pa., included 400 women, who researchers followed up with two weeks and again four weeks after they gave birth. They found wound separation rates were far higher for women who had staples: 16.8 percent, compared to 4.6 of those with stitches.

They also found composition wound complication rates for women with staples were at 21.8 percent with staples and 9.1 with stitches. Far more women who had staples — 36 percent — also required follow up visits with their doctors. This compares to only 10.6 percent of those who had stitches.

Doctors use staples because they’re faster, but the study also shows only by eight minutes. It took an average of 57 minutes for stitches, compared to 49 for staples.

Did you get stitches or staples after your c-section? Did you have any complications either way? Can you ask your OB to use stitches rather than staples or is that against protocol?

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Photo: about.com

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