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Tragedy in the Bronx: Four Dead After Metro North Train Derails

BaZ-ag1CMAIU3s4There was a tragic accident at the end of the hectic Thanksgiving travel weekend. In New York, a passenger train derailed near the Spuyten Duyvil station in the Bronx. Two rail cars were toppled over which resulted in four deaths and dozens of passengers being injured (the last count — according to CNN — was about 67).

The train was coming from the Hudson Valley town of Poughkeepsie, which is about 100 miles north of New York, and was on its way to Grand Central Station. At about 7 a.m. on Sunday morning, the train derailed. There is no cause determined yet, but the train operator reportedly stated that when he tried to apply the breaks, they did not stop the train.

This accident comes on the heels of a relatively safe Thanksgiving travel week, a time that is notoriously busy for planes, trains and roads.

I’m not sure why, but I always think of train travel as being worry free (it’s plane travel that freaks me out). Hearing stories of train crashes and derailments always seems shocking but there have been plenty of tragic train accidents, with several major train wrecks across the globe from Spain to Quebec.

Do you think of train travel as being safer than plane travel?

 UPDATE:

Since the day of the accident, several new news stories have been given more details about the tragic day in the Bronx. Apparently, the curve where the derailment occurred has a history of deadly accidents, most notably an accident way back on Jan. 13, 1882 which left 10 to 12 passengers dead.

There is also speculation that the accident was due to the driver of the train, William Rockefeller.  “I was in a daze,” he reportedly told police after that crash. “I don’t know what I was thinking about and the next thing I know I was hitting the brakes,” a law enforcement officer said Rockerfeller stated.  There are also reports that he was going far too fast for the zone, about 82 MPH.

Photo Source: ABC News via Breaking New AUS

 

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