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TSA Takes Pregnant Woman's Insulin

The TSA is supposed to protect you while you’re flying, not put your life in danger.

They did just that to a pregnant woman traveling from Denver to Phoenix recently. The woman was stopped and had her insulin confiscated by a TSA agent who told her it was an explosives risk.

This is not supposed to happen. All prescription medications are supposed to be allowed on airplanes; there are some additional security procedures you have to go through, but according to the complaint filed by this woman, she had her medication packaged appropriately and had a doctor’s note.

The TSA is claiming they took her insulin because the ice packs she used to keep it cold weren’t frozen solid enough. Um…ice melts, TSA dudes. She can’t control that, and just because the frozen water turns into somewhat slushy water doesn’t mean it magically becomes a threat to other travelers. It’s still just an ice pack.

Or, the TSA says, maybe they didn’t take her insulin at all. That’s not the proper procedure, so it probably just didn’t happen. Riiiight. Actually there’s been a string of passengers with medical issues being mistreated by the TSA all summer.

As the Stir points out, this incident not only jeopardized the life of the woman traveling, it put her pregnancy at risk as well. They write:

Let’s not forget that when you’re pregnant, any risks to your own body, especially things of this magnitude, can directly affect or put your baby at risk as well. It’s scary 1) that the TSA doesn’t know its own policy, which — as listed on their website — allows properly-labeled insulin and insulin tools of many types through, and 2) that this mistake could result in risking someone’s life.

Happily, this woman was able to sneak through half a vial of insulin, and arranged to have more delivered to her in Arizona. She shouldn’t have had to do any of that, though. The TSA should be helping people get safely to their destinations, not harming them while they try to travel.

Photo: Melissa

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