VIDEO: Mom Takes Kid For a Drag

dragging-kidIt’s been three months since a mother was arrested for child abuse, but suddenly a video of her literally dragging her kid on a leash through a Verizon Wireless store has gone viral.

And people are still trying to defend her!

Take a gander at the video:

OK, this was not a cranky child kicking and screaming being dragged by a mom by the arm. We’ve all been there.

This woman wasn’t A. watching what happened with her child (did you see near the end, where she almost slammed his head into the wall as she rounded the corner) and B. a frustrated mom at the end of her rope desperately to avoid a scene in a busy store.

That’s the defense being thrown up – that this child was naughty, and mom was just trying to get him out of there. Also popular is the “I understand” defense from parents who think frustration is a good excuse.

I’m not big on parents who leash kids to begin with, and it’s a prejudice that pre-dates my own parenting. I was walking out of a mall restaurant once, only to have a child on a leash dart out in front of me. Knowing I’d fall, I erred on the side of caution, twisting my body so that my back jarred against the hard mall floor. The child landed on top of me, unharmed. And what did I earn for my sore hip? Angry parents who blamed me for walking into their leash instead of themselves for letting their kid run six feet in front of them on a wire at calf-height.

Leashes are godsends for parents in certain situations – single parents going to an airport with all their bags, plus their child’s. Parents taking a small child into a big city for the first time. Parents who know to keep a – for lack of a better phrase – tight rein on their kid.

But leashes beg for abuse – the parents who think they no longer have to watch what their child is doing because the leash acts as a babysitter. Parents who would drag their child around a store.

The mom was arrested for felony child abuse. Her child suffered injuries to his neck. Would you defend her?

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