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Want a Girl? Do Not Eat Bananas

Wish you could add a girl to your brood of boys? Or are you hoping for a Y chromosome among all those X ones? A new study out of Holland suggests that a pre-conception mother’s diet may play a bigger role than timing in whether she’ll give birth to a boy or a girl.

Researchers studied the ovulation cycles, frequency of intercourse and diets of women who hoped to be getting pregnant within a few months. One thing the scientists found was support for a frequently touted strategy: couples trying to have a girl increased their chances with more frequent sex, as long as they abstained immediately before or after ovulation.

More interestingly was the diet, which appeared to play a more dramatic role.

Of the 172 women in the study who were hoping for a girl (they had all previously given birth to boys), 80 of those who cut out salt and ate at least a pound of dairy each day went on to conceive girls.

An article in the U.K. Mail listed the girly foods, which are high in calcium or magnesium: yogurt and hard cheese, almonds, rhubarb and spinach, beans and Brazil nuts among others.

Salty and potassium-rich foods to cut out, unless your trying for a boy, are anything processed, bananas, anchovies, olives and potatoes, among others.

The fact that 80 percent of the women who were on the girl-making diet got pregnant with girls is pretty compelling. But I’d also like to know whether they were using timing method. And what percent of those on the timing method only got pregnant with girls. Can diet really make that much of a difference?

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Photo: babble.com

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