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What's Wrong with a V.I.P. Section at a Middle School Dance?

As if the emotional social mine field of middle school wasn’t heart wrenching enough, one school in Los Angeles has upped the angst ante. To highlight the haves from the have-nots and the in crowd from the out, the school opted to introduce a “V.I.P.” section at their dance.

By definition, if there is a “very important person” that means that others aren’t as important. And with these middle schoolers already struggling with identity and their own self-worth, being designated as a V.I.P. by the school for a price is a unproductive policy to employ.

The New York Times‘ Motherlode blog wrote about Marcy Magiera, of the blog BellaNoise, who speaks of her own first-hand experience with this unsettling fundraising tool at her son’s school.

According to Magiera, if students pony up an extra five bucks, then they are allowed to hang in the V.I.P. lounge, where the in-crowd, or those who have an extra five bucks, can indulge in a dessert bar and also get goody bags.  But as Motherlode notes, this extra aspect to the dance is a “misguided social superiority — and of course that it’s all in fun, and who would really believe an extra $5 made you a ‘V.I.P.?’”

And while this may just seem like a misguided way to make some extra money for yet another cash-strapped California school the social message doesn’t seem worth the price.

Would you want your child to pay $5 buck for “V.I.P” access or would you ask them to boycott the idea?

Image: istockphoto

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