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When Sports Parents Attack: Hockey Dad Charged For Shining A Laser At Opposing Goalie

Courtesy: Winthrop Police Dept & ABC News

We are a sports family.  Even at a young age, my small people are taking their turns with baseball, softball, soccer and basketball.  They love all of them.

And you know what?  They want to win.  And when I’m cheering from the sidelines, I am, in fact, cheering for them to score and have fun.

I get it.  Winning is fun.

But winning isn’t everything. Trying your best is a crucial life lesson my husband and I are choosing to impart, as well as the ability to be gracious in defeat.

Winning is easy.  Losing is not.

And apparently some parents think the solution is to cheat.

Take 42-year-old Massachusetts hockey dad Joseph Cordes, for example.  Cordes is accused of aiming a laser beam into the eyes of the goalie on the team opposing his daughter.  Are you kidding me?  According to Good Morning America, other parents noticed a green beam on the goalie’s helmet during the third period, when the score was tied 1-1.

Cordes was escorted from the rink and is now facing criminal charges of disturbing the peace.

It is hard enough to teach children to play fairly and to respect wins and losses without this type of ridiculous behavior from parents. I want my children to succeed just like the next parent, but WHAT is the MATTER with people? Deliberately sabotaging a high school game? Unacceptable.

Read more from Danielle on Strollerderby and her personal sites ExtraordinaryMommy and DanielleSmithMedia.
You can also follow her on Twitter.

More from Danielle on Strollerderby:

Pinterest Is Making Money From Your Posts: Sneaky Or Genius?
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Sticks and Stones: My Son Cut His Hair So Another Child Would Stop Calling Him A Girl

 

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