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Where Men Earn Only One-Third as Much as Women

dads and household chores, wage gap

Just standing there, he's making fake money!

Just in time for Father’s Day, a not-so-scientific study= concluded that the value of Dad’s household work is quite a bit less than that of Mom’s. Turns out killing bugs, grilling, and taking out the garbage just doesn’t earn the kind of fake coin that band-aiding boo-boos, cooking dinner, and folding baskets of laundry does.

So though we still suffer a wage gap when it comes to real money, moms can comfort themselves that their imaginary paychecks are through the roof! Like, three times as much as dads’ household value.

Insure.com created a Dad value index and found that, after dividing household jobs into stereotypical sexist categories, Dads only do about $20K on average worth of chores in a year. By contrast, moms exceed $60K. The value was calculated by assigning different hourly rates for each job. For example, killing insects earns, in fake money, $15.65 per hour. Working through the family finances gets $33.72 per hour. (See the rest of the hourly ghost-wage chart here.)

A different study found that while men are still way behind women in the hours put into the household (on average, of course), their contributions and, therefore, value, have been on the rise.

Salary.com collected responses from more than 3,000 dads and found that “the value of what the dads did jumped to $36,757 this year from $33,858 the previous year. A previous study of work done by working moms found what the moms do at home is valued at $66,979, compared to $63,471 in 2011.” The survey found that working dads were doing more laundry this year, though they cut back a bit on kitchen duty.

Guess that’s how they’re finding balance.

So what’s the take-away from these two reports, summarized over at Today.com? Dads are doing slightly more, moms are still worth a ton and unpaid salary metaphors are irritating, especially when they include compensation for listening to kids’ problems (psychologist: $4,219 per year).

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