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Why Were Uggs Banned in a PA Middle School? And No, It Was Not Brought on by the Fashion Police

Uggs Banned

The students at Pottstown Middle School located somewhere in chilly Pennsylvania can no longer wear their cozy Ugg boots to class. And apparently, they only have themselves to blame for this ban.

No, it’s not because the principal thinks Uggs are totally, like, 2010, it’s that the kids are using their roomy footwear to hide items that aren’t allowed in class …

The school has a strict rule that no cellphones, iPods or other electronic gear can be brought into the classroom, but communication-addicted kids were smuggling their phones in by hiding them in their boots.

“Students may continue to wear outdoor boots to and from school to protect them from cold, snow and ice but need to change into a pair of sneakers or shoes before entering homeroom. Students may also continue to wear lace-up, tight at the ankle, boots, shoes and high-top sneakers,” said a letter sent home with students.

And the community? They apparently think it’s a ridiculous new rule and said just that on Facebook. “Quite absurd,”  a poster said. “How about a cell phone ban in school, as reasonable footwear is more necessary than a cell phone? UGG…Sounds like fashion profiling…lol!” And a student wrote, “Hmmm. I know most girls hide them in their bra, or their waist band. It’s ineffective. They will just keep finding other places. Plus my phone fits in my sneaker.”

Do you think that’s a silly rule or practical?

Image Source: Zappos

Plus, check out these 18 memorable school bans

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