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Why You Should Buy Your Baby A Plane Seat

Summer travel season is upon us and with sky high airline ticket prices, some parents are happy to be able to save money by holding their infants on their laps.

But experts say parents shouldn’t be thrifty when it comes to their baby’s safety. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)  is urging parents to buy babies their own seats.

I have to agree.

It always seem odd to me that parents who are so uptight when it comes to car seats, seem to think that the same principles don’t apply up in the air. Yes, I realize that it’s statistically more likely that you’ll get into a car accident than a plane crash. But that’s not accounting for turbulence, which can strike at any time and result in serious injuries if not death for lap babies.

My husband and I have always forked over the extra dough for a seat for our daughters. Not only did it help us rest easier about potential accidents, it also helped us (and perhaps fellow passengers) have a more pleasant flight.

According to current rules, babies under 2 can fly for free if they sit on a parents’ lap.

“Saying it’s OK to have lap-held child sends the wrong message to parents. It’s not OK to have a lap-held child in an aircraft,” said Debbie Hersman, chairman of the NTSB told CBS News. “The laws of physics don’t change for babies. They need to be restrained, too.”

The NTSB, along with the Association of Flight Attendants, has been urging the Federal Aviation Administration and airlines to require seats for babies for years.

But many parents would rather save the money on the cost of the additional ticket. Airlines, no doubt, are concerned that the increased cost it will cut down on family travel.

Safety experts say that during unexpected turbulence puts lap-held babies at risk — under those circumstances, babies can easily become projectiles. On its website, the FAA encourages parents to use child safety restraints doesn’t plan to make it a requirement.

The FAA fears parents will opt to drive rather than fly if they are required t buy tickets for their babies. And we all know that flying is more dangerous than flying. But why is a babies’ life any less important than an older kid?

Airlines once offered discount tickets for children under 2, but, unfortunately, that no longer is the case. Still, ultimately, your child’s safety is more important than any amount of money. Right?

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/abennett96/

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