Your Daily WTF: Mom Banned from Photographing Her Own Daughter Until Other Parents Sign Off

Girls Sports

Wait! Did all parents sign off on this photo?

If you’re like me, you take scores of photos of your kids every week (thank God for small favors in the shape of the iPhone 4S and its digital camera wonderfulness). I’m a kind of obnoxious mom who likes to document just about everything so I can put photos of each of my kids into a book annually around their birthdays.

If you’re like me, you wouldn’t take too kindly to someone telling you that a permission slip was required to photograph your own child.

According to Free Range Kids, a mom wanted to take a photo and a short video of her daughter playing basketball for the girl’s grandparents, but was told she needed to get permission from all of the parents of the other players on the team, as well as the parents of players on the opposing team and the umpires, too. Written permission from the basketball association was also required.

I hardly consider myself a Free Range parent. I barely let my nearly-4-year-old daughter walk the 25 feet to our neighbor’s house without making sure she gets inside safely. But I’m not sure this is a Free Range issue. It’s pretty much just a stupid issue.

Why all the paranoia about having a kid’s picture taken during a public sporting event? What, exactly, is going to happen? Is someone going to photograph a strange kid and then use it for some kind of kiddie porn? Will the photo be used to study, stalk, harass and kidnap a child? It’s so absurd. Beyond absurd, actually.

Free Range Kids’ Lenore Skenazy also suggests maybe too many people are technophobic and think that a picture taken and digitally transmitted could end up on a Facebook page where anybody could see it (oh no! not that!), which will somehow then put the child in danger.

I’m all about protecting my kids. But if this happened to me, I’d be protecting them right out of that league and into one where I could take pictures of my own children at will.

Can you imagine being asked to obtain permission from all of those people before being allowing to photograph your own kid?

Photo credit: iStock

 

 

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