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Are Corgis Going Extinct?

Last week, the news broke that Pembroke Welsh Corgis were endangered, at least in the UK. This in turn led to outcries across the internet that corgis were going extinct. Here is why you do not need to panic.

dont panic

The endangered reports came about when the British Kennel Club announced that the Pembroke was on its “at watch” list and was likely to be classed as a “vulnerable native breed” by early next year. This designation is set based on the number of new registrations for a breed, which has fallen for the Pembroke Corgi in the UK.

Blame for the drop has been placed by some on a UK law banning tail docking, which allegedly led to breeders dropping the breed because it would change its look. Pembrokes do not have tails, although it is not uncommon to see some with “nubs” for the tail area, especially among non-registered Pembrokes. The Cardigan Corgi, which is a separate breed, does have a tail. Others have blamed the drop on the rise in foreign small breeds, which have become increasingly popular.

So, are Corgis in danger of going extinct? Personally, I think those who took the news of a new classification and broadcast it as news that Corgis are going to end up extinct were greatly exaggerating things. A drop in breed registrations is hardly the same as an entire breed going extinct. Further, the classification is applied only by the British Kennel Club. It does not look at the Corgi population in other countries, nor does it look at the instances of unregistered corgis.  I honestly don’t think there is reason to get too crazy worried about this.

I told my Pembroke Corgis Ty and Eve that some say that their breed might be going extinct. Neither seemed concerned. Ty ran to his food dish, so I guess “extinct” rhymes with some unknown Corgi word for “dinner.” Eve climbed in my lap and licked my face. If they are not worried, then neither should you be!

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