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How Much Does it Cost to Own a Pet Each Year?

How Much Does it Cost to Have a Dog or Cat Per Year?

One of the recent discussions in my house lately has been from my kids. You see, they want a dog … or a bird… or a fish even though we have 2 cats already. They are getting old and the time where they may not be with us any longer is something we have to discuss seriously.

I don’t know if we will be ready for another pet right away and certainly I don’t think we’re ready for one now — with 3 kids and 2 cats! I will admit though I do debate in my head about adding another pet to our house.

Not only is the decision to add a pet a ‘space’ thing, but pets cost money!  Not just the initial adoption costs, but the first year is expensive and then year after year you have to think about food, vet bills, toys, and in certain areas — the licensing fees to have a pet. It’s important to look at all the incidentals because the truth is, pets can be expensive! The ASPCA breaks down all the costs that you can expect when it comes to pet ownership so you’re not in the dark when making the decision to get a pet for the family — but also say. “you shouldn’t expect to pay less than this, and you should definitely be prepared to pay more”.

Click through to find out the breakdown of how much a dog, cat, guinea pig and fish cost per year on average:

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  • A Fish 1 of 7
    A Fish
    The initial cost of owning a fish you need to factor in the cost of aquariums and will cot around $200. The annual cost of a fish is only estimated aroun $35 per year for food and incidentals. Not bad.
    Photo credit: iStockPhoto
  • A Guinea Pig 2 of 7
    A Guinea Pig
    A common first animal for kids will cost you an initial cost of $70 but yearly may cost as much as $635 when you factor in food, vet bills and litter.
    Photo credit: iStockPhoto
  • Owning a Small-sized Dog 3 of 7
    Owning a Small-sized Dog
    If you're looking at getting a small-sized dog like this little guy you can expect to pay an initial cost of $470 and then around $580 every year.
    Photo credit: iStockPhoto
  • Owning a Medium-sized Dog 4 of 7
    Owning a Medium-sized Dog
    Medium-sized dogs are the going to cost an upfront fee of about $565 and will then yearly cost about $695.
    Photo credit: iStockPhoto
  • Owning a Big-sized Dog 5 of 7
    Owning a Big-sized Dog
    If you're more a big-dog type the start up costs which include neutering/spaying and training will cost around $560 and a yearly cost of $875 thanks to their larger food bill.
    Photo credit: iStockPhoto
  • Owning a Cat 6 of 7
    Owning a Cat
    If you're a cat person, they will run around $375 for the initial costs which include spaying/neutering and getting all the essentials. After, they will run about $670 each year.
    Photo credit: iStockPhoto
  • What Else to Expect 7 of 7
    What Else to Expect
    These costs don't include the initial adoption cost of the animal which can run quite high. Some animals also come with special fees such as grooming and they also don't include any dog sitting or dog walker fees. Be sure you do research and realistically look at how much it will cost financially before you get yourself a new family member.
    Photo credit: iStockPhoto

For some simple money saving tips — visit Yahoo Money Talks News

Photo credit: iStockPhoto

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