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12 Facts About Twin Pregnancy

12 Facts About a Twin Pregnancy

When I found out this past Monday that I’m carrying twins, I became incredibly excited and filled with joy and scared. Quite. I mean, I knew it would be a possibility because of our IVF treatments, but, to be honest, I never really suspected that I would actually get pregnant with twins. Any daydream or forethought I’ve had about my experience as a mother always included two kids but not twins.

I’m thrilled by the thought of an insta-family. Boom. Done. I’ll be 35 by the time these little ones are born, and the idea of being “done” creating our family the thought of no more fertility treatments, or trips to the doctors, or monthly testing, or weekly transvaginal ultrasounds, or constant monitoring, or injection after injection feels great and lets me breathe a little easier.

But the thought of twins… It’s wonderful and overwhelming. Joyous and nerve-wracking. I’ve been trying to get pregnant since April, and all the while I’ve been researching and learning so much about pregnancy. And now I feel like I need to start all over again! Twin pregnancies are pretty different than singleton pregnancies, so I’ve learned.

I’m in for quite the ride with this twin pregnancy! And I’m ready for it all.

After the jump, check out 12 Facts About Twin Pregnancies that you probably never knew. Did you have twins? Are you currently pregnant with multiples? Talk to me, ladies!

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  • Twins Have a Smaller Birth Weight 1 of 12
    Twins Have a Smaller Birth Weight
    The average twin weighs 5 1/2 pounds at birth.
    Source: Fit Pregnancy
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Average Weight Gain for a Twin Pregnancy is 37-54 Pounds 2 of 12
    Average Weight Gain for a Twin Pregnancy is 37-54 Pounds
    For women of average size, optimal pregnancy weight gain for a singleton pregnancy is roughly between 25 and 35 pounds, so those of us carrying twins are expected to gain quite a bit more than them. Oh joy.
    Source: WebMD
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Morning Sickness Can Be Worse 3 of 12
    Morning Sickness Can Be Worse
    This, I dread. Supposedly, morning sickness can be worse for women pregnant with twins, as there's a higher level of human chorionic gonadotropin the hormone linked to morning sickness.
    Source: WebMD
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Greater Risk of Preeclampsia and Gestational Diabetes 4 of 12
    Greater Risk of Preeclampsia and Gestational Diabetes
    No one's really sure why, but preeclampsia occurs more with twin pregnancies than with non-twin pregnancies. This actually slightly terrifies me.
    Source: Parents.com
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Lactation Consultant Often Required 5 of 12
    Lactation Consultant Often Required
    Many women who give birth to twins and wish to breastfeed need to seek the help of a lactation counselor. Breastfeeding twins is a whole new ball game.
    Source: Parents.com
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • More Prenatal Visits to the Doctor 6 of 12
    More Prenatal Visits to the Doctor
    Twin pregnancies require more monitoring, which means more trips to the doctor for ultrasounds and general monitoring.
    Source: WebMD
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Need Average of 2,700 Calories a Day 7 of 12
    Need Average of 2,700 Calories a Day
    Doesn't that sound like a lot? I love to eat, and I'm hoping my appetite doesn't go away, because I'm so ready to chow down.
    Source: Parents.com
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Labor is Much Longer, Delivery a Little Longer 8 of 12
    Labor is Much Longer, Delivery a Little Longer
    Vaginal delivery is totally possible with twin pregnancies, but labor tends to be significantly longer not the best news. But delivery is usually only slightly longer than those of singleton births.
    Source: Parents.com
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Increased Likelihood of C-section 9 of 12
    Increased Likelihood of C-section
    That being said, twin pregnancies often result in births via c-sections.
    Source: Fit Pregnancy
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Spotting More Common 10 of 12
    Spotting More Common
    Spotting can occur in the absence of cramps, and this shouldn't be alarming. But spotting with cramps, passing blood clots, and active bleeding is cause for concern.
    Source: WebMD
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Need to Take More Vitamins 11 of 12
    Need to Take More Vitamins
    Folic acid intake may need to be increased for a twin pregnancy, and a prenatal vitamin with higher doses of iron will likely be prescribed to support both babies.
    Source: Parents.com
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Higher-risk Pregnancy 12 of 12
    Higher-risk Pregnancy
    Overall, twin pregnancies are higher-risk pregnancies. Of course, that scares me a little. But I trust my doctors, say my prayers, and take the best care of myself as I can the rest is out of my hands.
    Source: WebMD
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo

Main Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons

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10 Ways to Fight Fatigue During the First Trimester
Celebrating Our 1st Anniversary with the News of TWINS!

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