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Alcohol Company Foots Bill For Campaign Aimed At Stopping Pregnant Woman From Drinking Booze

Who's running the PR department over at Guinness? Well done.

There’s a new health campaign directed at pregnant woman. The program will be run by the National Organisation on Foetal Alcohol Syndrome UK and will reach 10,000 midwives who will advise at least one million pregnant women over the next three years.

Telling pregnant women to avoid alcohol isn’t unusual, it’s who’s behind the campaign that’s a surprise.

Guinness, the world’s biggest spirits company.

As madeformums.com reports, Diageo, the business behind popular drinks brands Guinness, Smirnoff Ice and Baileys has pledged 4 million pounds so that midwives can lecture expectant moms about the dangers of drinking.

The British government’s current advice to pregnant women regarding alcohol is that they should avoid it if possible, but that one or two units a week after the first trimester are okay.

But not everyone is okay with Diageo’s involvement in the campaign. Some doctors with the British Medical Association say there’s an obvious conflict of interest. Not necessarily. It’s a brilliant public relations move on Diageo’s part. It gets their name out there, and how much business are they really losing by paying to advise pregnant women not to drink? The few women who listen to their midwives and decide not to drink? They probably weren’t going to drink anyway.  And they might make up for it when breastfeeding women need a little help.  Guinness is often the beer recommended to stimulate milk production.  It’s what Mariah Carey was advised to drink when someone called Child Protective Services on her. Although, as Rebecca Odes reports, that doesn’t mean you’re cool to break out into keg stands. 

What do you think? Should business be involved in your health? Should an alcohol company be involved in a campaign aimed at pregnant women? Like me, do you think it’s a smart business move?

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