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14 Questions and Tips for Hiring a Nanny, Drama-Free, While Pregnant

14 Questions and Tips for Hiring a Nanny (and Eliminating the Drama) While PregnantMaybe you’re so on the ball with this pregnancy that you’ve got childcare all figured out. Maybe it’s crazy work hours. Maybe it’s the fear of the flu. Maybe the daycare in your area isn’t the best. Maybe it’s just easier on everyone. If you’re thinking of in home care, read on!

As a former nanny, who now employs one, I’m here to give you my tried and true advice on hiring someone before your baby arrives. You need to discuss things that you may think aren’t important (They might be down the road!) or that you might hesitate to bring up in an interview. These are questions and considerations that I wish parents had taken the time to figure out prior to me sitting in their living room. It happened time and time again!

These topics are not live-in specific, but can certainly be tailored to fit that situation. Whatever you end up deciding, know that working out some of the kinks ahead of time will save you a lot of drama and headaches in the crazy days to come when you’re trying to hire.

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  • Would you hire a manny? 1 of 14
    Would you hire a manny?
    It's something to consider. Many men these days get into the childcare field and stay long term with families.
  • How will you both handle maternity leave? 2 of 14
    How will you both handle maternity leave?
    Would you like her there to start to bond and see your routine? Do you want that time alone? But make sure to ask how she feels with you in the house all day and her with not a whole lot to do.
  • What are your expectations? 3 of 14
    What are your expectations?
    Yes, babies sleep a lot. But when they're up, and especially when they're fussy, they require a lot of attention and work. It's fine to ask a potential nanny about pitching in with baby's laundry or some light household chores, but make sure they're reasonable. She's there to be a childcare provider first, so know some days that will, and should, take priority.
  • Can your nanny wait for your baby? 4 of 14
    Can your nanny wait for your baby?
    Hiring someone 6 months out of your due date means you have a real risk or losing him or her before the baby gets here. Unless your candidate has another job that will end then, it's a long time to ask someone to wait around for you. Many families offer some sort of incentive to wait, but there isn't any guarantee. A better bet is a few weeks out.
  • Will she stay long term? 5 of 14
    Will she stay long term?
    If you're looking for a caregiver who will be with your family for years to come, barring anything obvious, be sure to bring that up. If she's just there for the summer, that would be the time to know.
  • Can you afford in home childcare? 6 of 14
    Can you afford in home childcare?
    Let's face it, hiring a nanny is usually more expensive than daycare. She's coming to your house on your hours and your child is getting one on one attention. There are ways to cut costs; nanny shares for instance. But make sure you have a realistic idea of how much this will cost you before you get a shock at her first paycheck.
  • Are you ready to hire someone? 7 of 14
    Are you ready to hire someone?
    Contrary to popular opinion, in home nannies are not (ever!) independent contractors that pay their own taxes. They work in your home and use your supplies on your child. You'll need to find an accountant or tax agency that specializes in helping you pay them correctly. Then at tax time? Claim that child care credit!
  • Ready for a background check? 8 of 14
    Ready for a background check?
    Don't worry about insulting a great candidate with this question, any nanny worth his or her salt will be more than happy to have one run. It's for your peace of mind and most agencies/nanny sites can do one online.
  • What age range are you comfortable with? 9 of 14
    What age range are you comfortable with?
    Do you want a more motherly type? Older? Younger? How young? Each carries it's own pros and cons, but finding the right fit for your family and needs is really all that matters.
  • What is her other schedule like? 10 of 14
    What is her other schedule like?
    So you need someone 45 hours a week, and she's in school every night. That might be a huge red flag for burnout. Check to see that whatever you need is something she's willing to work with, especially if your work schedule tends to change.
  • Will you be coming home to nurse? 11 of 14
    Will you be coming home to nurse?
    If so, how often? What do you expect your nanny to do during that time, if anything? Be clear on when you need her home so you don't show up ready and she's at the park.
  • Is your nanny willing to use pumped milk? 12 of 14
    Is your nanny willing to use pumped milk?
    Better to ask upfront than find out who you hired has no interest in serving your baby that liquid gold. If she isn't comfortable with your choice, move on.
  • Is your nanny willing to make formula? 13 of 14
    Is your nanny willing to make formula?
    If you've got an anti-formula caregiver on your hands, you've also got a big problem. Know beforehand that whoever you hire is going to respect the choices you make. Transitioning back to work and being a new mom is hard enough without someone who can't or doesn't want to make a bottle.
  • How much experience do they have? 14 of 14
    How much experience do they have?
    So she watched her little cousin after school for a year at 15. That's not ideal for someone who will have a hours to fill with an infant. Take time to find candidates that have experience with babies and references to back it up.

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Diana blogs on raising a toddler daughter and the loss of her twin boys on the aptly named Hormonal ImbalancesSmaller glimpses into her day are on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest.

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