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BPA Exposure in Pregnancy Might Cause Behavioral Issues for Girls Later

When I was pregnant the first time, I was so anxious that I was going to eat the ‘wrong’ thing or do the ‘wrong’ thing. Fearing that something would go wrong — to the pregnancy or my child later because of choices I made while pregnant.

Those fears and ‘oh no’s‘ are all over the place and everyone has their own opinions. There are studies out everywhere over what is safe and what is to be avoided. A new study was just published this week in the journal Pediatrics which found a link between girls who developed behavioral problems by the age of three if their mothers ate food stored in containers made with BPA while they were pregnant.

Click through to find out more about the study and what this all means.

The study showed that girls whose mothers had high urine levels of BPA during pregnancy scored worse for behavior measures including anxiety and hyperactivity then other girls in the same age group while boys seemed unaffected.  The girls who seemed affected were still measuring within normal levels though and not considered ‘clinically abnormal’ behavior. However, the study noted that for every 10-fold increase in mothers’ BPA levels the girls scored at least 6 points worse.

Taking into account other possible influences for the children’s behavior (which included family income, breastfeeding, education level and family situations) the finding still held a connection back to the BPA levels.  The researches plan to re-test the study participants again when they reach the ages of 5 and again at age 8.

BPA is most often found in plastic bottles and tin cans and was widely used in baby bottles and sippy cups though industry is phasing that out.  In 2010 Canada formally declared BPA to be hazardous to human health.

:: Are you worried about this new study? ::

Image: vichie81 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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