Doomed to Lifelong Restless Legs!

As the third trimester rolls around in each of my pregnancies, the dreaded restless legs start. It never fails either, so I am really not looking forward to the 28 week mark this time around. But what sucks even more is a new study I read about restless legs during pregnancy yesterday. I totally cried.

According to a small European study, women who suffer from restless legs during pregnancy are four times more likely to have the condition again after pregnancy, and three times more likely to suffer from a chronic form of the condition. Seriously?  Throw me a bone here!

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Restless Leg Syndrome can be described as:

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder characterized by throbbing, pulling, creeping, or other unpleasant sensations in the legs and an uncontrollable, and sometimes overwhelming, urge to move them. Symptoms occur primarily at night when a person is relaxing or at rest and can increase in severity during the night. Moving the legs relieves the discomfort. Often called paresthesias (abnormal sensations) or dysesthesias (unpleasant abnormal sensations), the sensations range in severity from uncomfortable to irritating to painful.

As if it isn’t hard enough to get comfortable during pregnancy, especially in the last trimester…this completely ruins the chances of sleep altogether. I guess it is getting you ready for all those 2 a.m. feedings right?  Just the thought of it all over again makes me want to curl up into the fetal position and cry.

I am torn between the study findings because the survey size was so small — 207 women to be exact. But it did track them over a longer period of time. As someone who has been through this with both of my pregnancies, I would like to see a larger, and more long term study done to see if the results from this specific study truly are accurate.

I certainly can hope they are wrong…right??

photo credit : flickr.com/meddygarnet

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