Categories

Giving Birth in an MRI Machine… Bad Idea!

This past week the newswire was beaming with reports of a woman who successfully gave birth in an MRI machine overseas. Researchers involved with the project cited the reason as research — they wanted to learn more about the process of giving birth and why the cesarean rate is rising around the world.

Researchers hope to see in greater detail how the baby moves through the birth canal. But unfortunately for most women, this new technological breakthrough won’t do much for them but continue to push the way births are handled further down the wrong road.

In discussing this on my personal Facebook page, I even had the experience of reading an obstetrician’s criticism of this new medical development. Calling it “Very dumb and useless new research.”  I couldn’t agree more!

But why is this unnecessary, and potentially harmful, for birthing women around the world?  Could this make a big change in how women give birth? From the perspective of someone who thinks births need to be more hands off to lower the cesarean section rates. Studies show that the less medical interventions such as labor inductions can help to move the c-section rate in a downward motion. As well as prenatal care more available for women to help ensure healthy pregnancies.

But there are also non-medical ways to lower c-section rates: Using the support of a doula during labor, taking a childbirth education class, and simple things like watching your diet, and interviewing various medical care providers to find the best fit for your line of thinking, and what you want for childbirth.

I don’t think researchers and obstetricians are going to realize anytime soon that the best way to handle birth sometimes is simply being hands off. Lower the rate of monitoring, get women up and out of bed, and get them off of their backs during labor!  The back is simply the worst position for a woman to give birth on!

What do you think of this new advance in medical science?

photo : flickr.com/muffet

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest