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Going Once, Going Twice . . . Win a Real Baby in the U.K.!

Baby

This could be yours for the price of a $32 ticket

Want a baby but can’t seem to make one on your own? There’s hope for you yet! A new lottery in the U.K. is offering contestants the chance to win their very own bundle of joy through in-vitro fertilization treatments.

Run by a fertility charity called To Hatch, $25,000 worth of personalized fertility treatments can possibly be yours for simply the price of a $32 ticket. Also part of the prize is a luxury hotel stay, chauffeur-driven ride to the treatment facility and the option of reproductive surgery, donor eggs, sperm or a surrogate birth if the IVF treatments fail to get you pregnant. Everyone single people, gay, elderly, straight and couples — are eligible to win.

Oh yeah — some people find the IVF “lottery drawing” demeaning, and ethical and medical groups are outraged.

Britain has something called a fertility regulator, which is the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority, who has denounced the lottery as “wrong and entirely inappropriate,” saying it “trivializes what is for many people a central part of their lives.”

However, To Hatch’s founder says the point is to create “the ultimate wish list” for those unable to conceive children naturally.

The lottery is perfectly legal, according to the Gambling Commission. It launches on July 30 and one “winner” will be chosen monthly.

How do you feel about winning IVF treatments through a lottery? Is it a good thing to offer hope to people who can’t afford IVF, or is it offering false hope since the odds of winning are probably small and it will just pile on to the emotional pain? Does this seem ethical to you?

Image: Wikimedia Commons

Join the fertility discussion: What happens to women who wait too long to have a baby?

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