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Adios, Harry Potter! Mexican Government Outlaws Strange Baby Names

So long, wizard!

With a veritable blizzard of strange and questionable baby names popping up all over the world this past year, officials in one country have decided that enough is enough.

Citing concern with bullying when children grow older as a primary reason behind the recent move, the Mexican state of Sonora has officially banned 61 kid names from the books, according to a Reuters article.

So, if you live in that part of the world and were seriously considering naming your future children Hitler, Robocop, Yahoo, James Bond, Christmas Day or Rolling Stone, among other things, you can forget about it.

It’s now against the law.

Of course, this raises some very important questions about personal freedom now, doesn’t it? I mean, sure, a lot of us scoff at some of the monikers certain modern parents go out of their way to tag their own children with, but still.

Should any government honestly have a say in that?  Or is that maybe going a wee bit too far?  It seems to me a rather obvious overstepping of boundaries, really, but then again… naming your kid Scrotum or Burger King (two more banned names) almost seems so stupid that maybe it DOES require a law, you know?

Similar laws against bizarre baby names are also on the books in countries like New Zealand, Italy, Sweden, Malaysia and Germany, just to name a few, so Sonora, Mexico certainly isn’t alone here.

It isn’t very hard to wince at the idea of someone naming a child Facebook or Terminator, but where do we draw the line about who has the right to decide for us all?

 

Image: blogdebebes.com

Info: Reuters, mom.me

You can also find Serge on his personal blog, Thunder Pie . And on Twitter

More Pregnancy on Babble:

How to Win the Baby Name Game

Pregnancy: An Ode to Fake Joy

5 Reasons I’m Excited About Our Home Birth

A Dad’s 12 Greatest Delivery Room Moments

 

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