Search
Explore

Red Raspberry Leaf Tea: Are You Drinking It?

So… I have patience problems. And that means that I’m on pins and needles as I wait for my baby to arrive. I’m dealing with my complete lack of patience by doing pretty much everything in my power to naturally induce labor as soon as possible. I’ve been walking, doing the deed, praying, eating spicy foods, looking up at the full moon, inhaling pineapple – I don’t care if it’s just an Old Wives’ Tale; I’m doing it!

I’ve also been drinking lots of red raspberry leaf tea. Before doing research, I mistakenly believed RRLT was a labor inducer, but it’s not.

Click through to find out why you should consider drinking RRLT late in pregnancy.

RRLT doesn’t induce labor, but anecdotal evidence suggests that it shortens the second stage of labor (the pushing stage). That’s because the leaf of the raspberry bush, when consumed as a tea or in capsule form, supposedly ‘tones’ the uterus, preparing it for more efficient contractions. RRLT has no impact on the pain associated with such contractions or cervical dilation. The scientific evidence supporting the theory that RRLT helps with the second stage of labor is extremely limited and inconclusive; however, many midwives, other natural birth practitioners, and even OB-GYNs swear by it.

In the very least, RRLT is a great source of many key vitamins and nutrients, including:

  • Rich concentrations of vitamin C
  • Vitamin E
  • Easily assimilated calcium and iron
  • Manganese and magnesium
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B complex
  • Many minerals including phosphorous and potassium

Most practitioners do not recommend drinking large amounts (more than a glass) until after week 36 of pregnancy. Although recommendations vary for how much full-term women should consume, I’ve been drinking 3 or 4 cups a day. Check with your doctor, of course, before taking any supplement during pregnancy.

(Source; Image Source)

Read more from Caitlin on Healthy Tipping Point and Operation Beautiful.  Follow all her Babble posts here!

Article Posted 3 years Ago
share this article
facebook twitter tumblr pinterest
See Comments
what do you think?
share this article
facebook twitter tumblr pinterest
See Comments
what do you think?
what do you think?
close comments
Subscribe to the
Newsletter
Welcome to
Settings
Sign Out
Follow us on
Social