The Baby Cheapskate Guide to Bargains

Fun fact: 76% of expecting parents think they are financially ready for a baby… but after the birth of the child, only 41 % feel financially stable. Babies are expensive. We all know that. But the real trouble isn’t how much things cost – it’s how much we overspend, and how we get trapped into thinking ‘wants’ are really ‘needs.’

Almost 50% of new parents say they spent more money than necessary on a car seat; 36% felt they overspent on strollers; and a quarter overspent on the crib.

That’s where the Baby Cheapskate comes in. 

Angie’s uber-popular blog documents daily sales, details how new parents can save cash on necessities, and spills shopping secrets. I especially love her “Toys that Get Played With” tag – one of the shopping things that I worry most about is buying my kiddo non-fun or boring toys. There’s even an entire “Top Diapers and Formula Deals of the Week” section to make shopping for these items easy.

Recently, I had the chance to review the new Baby Cheapskate book, The Baby Cheapskate Guide to Bargains: How to Save on Blankets, Bottles, and Everything Baby. If you’re interested in being a frugal, minimalist mama – or just not paying more than you absolutely have to – then you must pick up this book. The book goes well beyond the tips covered on the website, addressing topics like:

  • Building a shopping list
  • Creating a registry
  • Saving big with coupons
  • Setting up a nursery on a budget
  • Feeding baby for less
  • Saving on diapers options, including both cloth and disposables
  • Inexpensive clothing for baby
  • Saving cash on strollers, car seats, strollers, bouncers, bassinets, and more

I’m one of those people who know how to save money but rarely do it well (impulse shopper, what can I say!), and The Baby Cheapskate Guide to Bargains was a great wake-up call, refresher course, and motivator to spend wisely.  I love baby, but I don’t want to go broke before he or she even arrives.  Save, baby, save!

For more from Caitlin, check out Operation Beautiful and Healthy Tipping Point.

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