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The Dos and Don'ts of Pregnancy on Facebook

I remember back in the day when people thought it was somehow uncouth or impersonal to announce Important Things on Facebook. Now look. Births, deaths, marriages, breakups, and yes, pregnancies are all par for the course on the daily status update roll. Well, not daily, but at least once a month or so. There are certainly those who will suggest that the online community is not the place to disclose life events. But more and more, people seem to be looking at social networks as the default platform to communicate with all but their closest friends.

So, let’s say you’re pregnant, just hypothetically speaking. And you’re on Facebook, wondering how to go about coming out of the closet. Read on for some cute ideas from TheStir, as well as a couple of disclosure methods you might want to avoid.

Jeanne Sager came up with TheStir’s  list of suggested announcement techniques.

These were my two favorites:

“Put a bun in your (actual) oven and snap a photo for your profile.

Why It Works: It shows you have a sense of humor — and probably won’t be the type to update with every bowel movement.

Like the “I’m Pregnant” page and see who comments.

Why It Works: People are nosy — I fanned (and I’m not pregnant) and the comments were fast … and hilarious.”

You should not, she says, announce your pregnancy by status-updating your labor contractions. Even early labor. Even Braxton-Hicks.

Symptomatic whining, especially of an intimate sort, is frowned upon in some circles (but welcome in mine).

My sister announced her pregnancy with a status update about switching her nightly beer to ginger ale.

You could also go with the straight-up solution, nice and simple and sure to please: just post  “I’m pregnant” in the update box, and watch as the comments pour in. Punctuation could vary according to personality, mood, and level of exhaustion.

And for future  (or current depending on your status) reference—beware of the problem of the false positive.  You should expect that any mention of nausea, extreme exhaustion, weight gain or abstinence from alcohol will have people wondering whether you’re harboring. But then, isn’t that true in the real world, too?

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