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The Only Drug You Should Take for Morning Sickness — And It Isn’t Zofran

Zofran Isn't Safe for Morning Sickness

It wasn’t that long ago that news broke about Zofran being safe to take during pregnancy for morning sickness. But it seems that this drug, also known as ondansetron, isn’t safe at all.

According to new research published in Ob.Gyn. News, this drug carries risks to both mothers and babies. Specifically, taking Zofran during pregnancy increased a woman’s chance of having a baby with a congenital heart defect by 30 percent. Additionally, taking this drug during pregnancy also upped the risk of having a baby with cleft palate, and increased the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and serotonin syndrome, which are both dangerous to mothers and babies.

While Zofran is commonly prescribed to pregnant women for morning sickness, the drug is not labeled for use during pregnancy by the FDA, the article notes.

It is for these reasons that women should be cautious of taking this drug while pregnant. But that doesn’t mean you have to suffer from severe morning sickness; there is a drug approved by the FDA to take so you don’t have to spend your days hugging the toilet bowl.

Diclegis.

As the article states, Diclegis is not only approved for use during pregnancy, but it is also the only drug that has been “studied in hundreds of thousands of pregnant women and is a pregnancy category A drug there is now a safer option for women” suffering from morning sickness.

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Source: Ob.Gyn. News
Photo: iStockphoto

Read more of Aela’s writing on Babble and at Two Moms Make a Right

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More From Aela:
Why Doctors Have Redefined ‘Full Term’ in Pregnancy

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