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Tomorrow I’m Having an Epidural. Among Other Things.

Tomorrow I'm Having an Epidural. Among Other Things. I’ve had two past high risk pregnancies. Each of them were because of completely different factors. At 15 weeks this time around, my perinatologist, OB, and I have decided to try just about everything we can to minimize the risks and keep this baby in as long as possible.

One of the things we’ll do is a cerclage. For those of you who may not be familiar with that term, a cerclage is defined as:

“Any of several procedures for increasing tissue resistance in a functionally incompetent uterine cervix that usually involve reinforcement with an inert substance especially in the form of sutures near the internal opening”- Merriam-Webster.com

So in layman’s terms: I’m getting my cervix sewn shut.

Fun times.

This procedure means that tomorrow, bright and early, I’ll be in the hospital getting an epidural. This is a normal part of a cerclage, although some women are fully out for the entire thing. I wish that was me, but that’s ok. After the epidural is placed, my perinatologist will stitch, then I’ll need several more hours for the epidural to fully wear off. It’s a hard thing to do without Sam here (he’s still in Georgia for training) but no one wants to wait since a cervix can thin so quickly. A cerclage placed in a normal cervix is much more effective than an emergency one placed in a thinning cervix.

While there are some risks to this, they are mainly to my own body and not the baby. (If I go into preterm labor my cervix could tear.) They are minimal to this pregnancy and the benefits far outweigh the risks. I’m willing to do just about anything to make sure this baby stays in there.

Truth be told, I’m more nervous about the epi than the cerclage. I’ve had one before when I was in labor with Bella, but at that point being hit on the head with a hammer would have felt better than being in labor. So I don’t really remember anything about it, just the intense relief that came afterward.

After it’s done, I’ll be on anti-contraction medication for 3 days to avoid any kind of tearing. Then back to twice weekly doctor visits to make sure everything is staying the same.

It’s funny how we don’t really know about what pregnancy can be like when it’s not “normal.” Someone should write a book called, “What to Expect from your High Risk Pregnancy.”

Although then maybe no one would ever get pregnant again. :)

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Diana blogs on raising a toddler daughter and the loss of her twin boys on the aptly named Hormonal ImbalancesSmaller glimpses into her day are on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest.

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