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UK Sees Historic Low in Teen Pregnancy Rates

Good news coming out of the United Kingdom regarding their Teen Pregnancy rates. It has finally hit a historic low for the first time in 30 years!  Which makes me wonder how the United States can follow suit and work to lower the teen pregnancy rates right here in our own country.

When it comes to comparing developed nations around the world, The US, and the UK are pretty similar when it comes to the way we live.

While the number of teen pregnancies slightly fell in 2009 for the first time since 1997 to 39.1% per 1,000 live births. But when we look at this number we see that we have a significant difference from the UK. Their rate of teen births?  3.83% per the latest releases out of the country.

Lawmakers in the country have cited sexual health, and sexual relation education programs for the decrease in the number. While in the United States, we are still fighting to get more funding for the same programs that were cut during the years of the Bush Administration, and replaced with Abstinence Only education programs, which repeatedly have been proven to fail at preventing teen pregnancy, and STD transmission.

It is certainly a country we can take pointers from to help lower the rate of teen births, and pregnancies in our own country to get the growing problem under control.

But… what will it take?  With shows like 16 and Pregnant, Teen Mom, and Skins… what message are we sending the teenagers who are watching most of these programs?

What do you think we could do to help lower the Teen Pregnancy rates in the United States?

photo: flickr.com/Polina Sergeeva

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