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Wabi Sabi For New Parents: Designing For The Imperfect Life

I remember reading about Wabi-Sabi–a philosophy of design and living that embraces the “imperfect”– years ago. But it never occurred to me how nicely this particular philosophy lends itself to family life until I read this blog over at Design Sponge.

Reading about how to embrace nature and all of life’s imperfections, I immediately  began to think about how some of the more idiosyncratic little corners of our apartment might be less messy and more artful than I’d allowed myself to believe.

Everyone has his or her own taste, but the “clean surfaces” philosophy of strict minimalism can get a real workout when babies and children enter the scene. Shoving everything into sleek modernist cupboards can work well, but if you are tied to an extremely spare aesthetic even one little Lamaze mat is going to ruffle your feathers.

Maybe embracing a little Wabi Sabi is a good idea for all new parents. Even if you don’t go full-hog with the Buddhist Zen rustic wood and artfully cracked china look, just reading some of these passages on what Wabi Sabi is all about might make life (or at least the arrangement of it) a little more easy to imagine.

Check out this description of the book Living Wabi Sabi, and feel your shoulders drop:

“Wabi Sabi is the comfortable joy you felt as a child, happily singing off key, creatively coloring outside the lines, and mispronouncing words with gusto. On a deeper level, Wabi Sabi is the profound awareness of our oneness with all life and the environment. It includes a deep awareness of the choices we make each day, the power we have to accept or reject each moment of our lives, and to find value in every experience.”

Wow. I feel better already and I haven’t touched a thing in my house.

For more images from the house pictured above, look here.

photo: Apartment Therapy

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