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Want to Watch a Live Home Birth?

Ever want to see a live home birth for yourself?  And I don’t mean on one of those heavily edited birth programs we have on television that go for shock factor over the actual experience itself?  Then you can tune in this April to the blog of famous internet activist Gina Crosley-Corcoran, also known as The Feminist Breeder.

Her journey into motherhood started years ago with a c-section that turned her into an activist not only for informed consent in childbirth, but real birth options for mothers, especially after having one surgical birth.

I met Gina originally through the International Cesarean Awareness Network, which we both were chapter leaders of at the time. Her in the Chicago area, and myself in Connecticut. Her second son was a vaginal birth after cesarean also known as a VBAC while battling in a hostile hospital setting with providers who were less than supportive once the onset of labor. Her VBAC story and many other posts from her blog The Feminist Breeder have been featured in high profile national publications like The Chicago Tribune, The Huffington Post, and Forbes & Forbes Women.

Gina became pregnant with her third child, which I was actually right there with her when she found out in New York City for the BlogHer conference this passed year… we actually were at a Babble.com party too… how funny is that?  But the most exciting news of all was the opportunity for a high profile blogger to share her experiences of pregnancy, and planning for a home birth with a Certified Nurse Midwife. After the battle she went through for her VBAC in the hospital she knew that it was not a setting she wanted to birth in again.

I personally was excited to see the news, but the excitement turned me into a giddy school girl when this past week she announced that with the help of a friend, she is going to live blog her birth. Meaning photos, videos, and all kinds of live time goodies for her readers, fans, and just anyone on the internet to check out.

I personally was over the moon because as someone who works in the birth community, I find it so hard for women to see what a home birth really looks like, or understand how hands off a birth can be in general. When women get pregnant they tune into the crappy shows on your cable TV channels like One Born Every Minute, and A Baby Story which scared the living crap out of moms. I know that is what happened to me when I got pregnant with my first child. I wish I had the chance to see a real natural childbirth.

Gina explained further that she is publicizing her birth for a couple reasons:

To accurately document every step of this special day in ways that I was never allowed to while birthing in the hospital.

I have a platform and an opportunity to educate.

To show that it doesn’t have to be perfect.

I know many of my readers will be excited to follow along.

All great reasons, and ways to help educate others, and an awesome way for her to use her blog, and popularity for a great message that truly needs to be sent right now.

This also on the heals of the article on social media, and its impact on childbirth in general by Tina Cassidy.  Tina goes on to say:

While that can seem a little wrong, another example of compulsive oversharing in the social-media age, the truth is that in this case, technology is just facilitating the natural order of things. Until about a century ago, births mostly happened at home, with expectant mothers surrounded by their sisters-in-god, or “godsibbs“—the relatives and neighbors who talked their way through birth and gave us the word gossip. These women intuitively knew that their mere presence helped the mother. In fact, studies have shown that mammals get a boost of the “love” hormone oxytocin when they feel protected by those they know, and oxytocin works to speed labor. The opposite happens when they are surrounded by strangers in white coats, which could be why many of those giving birth in a hospital wind up having their labors stall and needing doses of Pitocin, an artificial version of the same hormone, to restart their contractions.

Personally, I plan on tweeting before, during (if I can) and after my daughter is born this time around. I also as Gina have a public platform to share my medically necessary scheduled c-section to help women know that you can make a c-section a positive experience, even though I have had two less than perfect experiences before this delivery.

Social media is truly changing the face of childbirth, and it is something we should use as a platform not only for change, but for education to new mothers who may truly need it.

So, if you are interested in checking out Gina’s Home birth… you can visit TheFeministBreeder.com for more details.

photo: thefeministbreeder.com

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