Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

MENU

While You Were Puking: Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update #11

Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update

Welp, it’s that time again. Friday. Which means two things in my world: 1) My workweek is hours away from ending and 2) It’s time for this week’s round-up of breaking pregnancy medical news! Have I told you how much I love writing this column? There’s always such great info coming to light.

This week, we discover the dangers of sleeping on your back while pregnant, the link between eating fish and ADHD in your child, what taking antidepressants during pregnancy does to your child’s language development, and much, much more.

After the jump, check out this week’s round-up of breaking pregnancy medical news!


  • Mom’s Depression Slows Baby’s Development; Antidepressant Use Increases Language Development 1 of 10
    Mom's Depression Slows Baby's Development; Antidepressant Use Increases Language Development
    A new study has found that maternal depression increases the odds of altered speech development in early childhood. However, the infants of women who took certain antidepressants during pregnancy actually showed signs of early language development.
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Sleeping on Back While Pregnant Increases Risk of Stillbirth 2 of 10
    Sleeping on Back While Pregnant Increases Risk of Stillbirth
    Women who sleep on their backs are six times more likely to have a stillbirth than those who sleep on their sides. Researchers believe it is because blood flow through a major vein that supplies blood to the womb is reduced when on your back.
    Source: Daily Mail
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Fat Distribution Affects Risk of Baby and Mother 3 of 10
    Fat Distribution Affects Risk of Baby and Mother
    The risk of developing certain pregnancy-related complications increase for those women who are overweight or obese, but a new study suggests that the type of fat is actually more directly related to the development of these complications than simply being overweight. Visceral fat, or fat surrounding inner organs, is more dangerous than peripheral fat, the fat around extremities.
    Source: Medical Xpress
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • No Clear Link Between Organic Food and Birth Defect 4 of 10
    No Clear Link Between Organic Food and Birth Defect
    Since certain pesticides contain "endocrine-disrupting" chemicals, it's been thought that eating organic while pregnant could reduce the risk of the birth defect, hypospadias an uncommon birth defect in boys that affects the penis. But a new study has found no link between eating organic and reduced rates of the birth defect.
    Read more about it on Babble here
    Source: Reuters
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Study Found Best Drugs to Slow Premature Birth 5 of 10
    Study Found Best Drugs to Slow Premature Birth
    A new meta-analysis has shown that prostaglandin inhibitors like Celebrex and Indocin, as well as some calcium channel blockers like nefedipine and nicardipine, are the best to stall labor and help prevent premature birth.
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Hand Weakness Affects 20% of Pregnant Women 6 of 10
    Hand Weakness Affects 20% of Pregnant Women
    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome affects 20 percent of pregnant women during their third trimester, a study has found. Fluid retention and swelling during pregnancy can increase pressure on a certain ligament in the wrist, causing hand numbness, tingling, and dull aches.
    Source: The Star
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Most Pregnancy-related Infections Caused by Four Treatable Conditions 7 of 10
    Most Pregnancy-related Infections Caused by Four Treatable Conditions
    U.S. researchers have identified four treatable conditions that often lead to pregnancy-related complications in low- and middle-income countries complications which include maternal death and fetal and newborn death. The treatable conditions included are infections of the genital tract, infections of the urinary tract, infections of soft tissues, and infections related to abortion.
    Source: Medical Xpress
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Healthy Diet After Gestational Diabetes Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes 8 of 10
    Healthy Diet After Gestational Diabetes Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
    Women who developed gestational diabetes during their pregnancies can greatly reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life simply by eating a healthy diet of whole grains, fresh fruits, vegetables, legumes, poultry, fish, nuts, and limited red and processed meats.
    Source: PharmPro
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Mercury in Fish Associated with ADHD 9 of 10
    Mercury in Fish Associated with ADHD
    Prenatal exposure to mercury has been found to be linked to ADHD in children. But certain nutrients in fish actually help prevent ADHD, which suggests the importance of eating the right types and amounts of fish during pregnancy.
    Read more about it on Babble here, and find out the best & worse fish to consume during pregnancy.
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Fresh Blood Cells No Better for Preemies 10 of 10
    Fresh Blood Cells No Better for Preemies
    A randomized trial has revealed that premature babies did not improve any more from the use of fresh red blood cells as compared to standard blood-banking practices. The use of fresh red blood cells also did not protect against nosocomial infections in the premature babies.
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo

Read more of Aela’s writing at Two Moms Make A Right

And don’t miss a post!
Follow Aela’s Baby-blog Board on Pinterest

Follow Two Moms Make a Right on Twitter and Facebook

More of Aela on Babble!
10 Ways to Fight Fatigue During the First Trimester
Celebrating Our 1st Anniversary with the News of TWINS!
12 Facts About Twin Pregnancy
10 “Dadchelor Party” Ideas for Baby Daddy
Top 20 Girls’ Names of 2012

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as:

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest