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While You Were Puking: Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update #18

Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update

Happy Friday to you, and Happy 17th Week of Pregnancy to me! Aren’t Fridays just wonderful?

There’s always so much going on when it comes to pregnancy medical news. And this week was no exception. From the danger of wearing high heels during pregnancy, to chronic pelvic pain from c-sections, to the American Academy of Pediatrics recommending that a mercury-based preservative remain in vaccines (say what?!), the news that concerns pregnant women the most is nothing short of interesting this week.

Be sure to check out what you might have missed, after the jump!

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  • High Heels Bad Idea in Late Pregnancy 1 of 7
    High Heels Bad Idea in Late Pregnancy
    This might seem like a no-brainer, but with a lot of pressure to be a "hot mama," many women can't put away the heels. The Australian Podiatry Associations warns that "Wearing high heels at any time is an injury risk but this is significantly increased when pregnant, particularly in the later stages as you gain weight and body mass, which affects balance and puts stress on the feet and ankles."
    Source: Fraser Coast Chronicle
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Marriage Has Significant Benefits for Pregnant Women 2 of 7
    Marriage Has Significant Benefits for Pregnant Women
    A new study out of Canada has found that "childbearing women who are married suffer less domestic abuse, substance abuse or post-partum depression around the time of their pregnancy than women who are living with a partner or those who do not have a partner."
    Source: Red Orbit
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Iodine Supplements Crucial During Pregnancy & Nursing 3 of 7
    Iodine Supplements Crucial During Pregnancy & Nursing
    New research is looking into the potential negative effects of iodine deficiency in women and how it affects their babies. Iodine is required for adequate thyroid hormone levels, which are critical for normal fetal neurodevelopment.
    Source: EurekAlert
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Hypoxia in Pregnancy May Cause ADHD 4 of 7
    Hypoxia in Pregnancy May Cause ADHD
    Exposure to ischemic-hypoxic events during pregnancy such as preeclampsia, birth asphyxia, and respiratory distress syndrome, increased a child's risk for developing ADHD by up to 47 percent.
    Source: Modern Medicine
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Long-term Exposure to Pollutants Can Slow Time it Takes Couples to Get Pregnant 5 of 7
    Long-term Exposure to Pollutants Can Slow Time it Takes Couples to Get Pregnant
    Having a hard time getting pregnant? You might be able to blame the city you live in. A new study suggests that couples exposed to high levels of certain pollutants took about 20 percent longer to get pregnant than couples with lower exposures.
    Source: Environmental Health News
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Persistent Pelvic Pain for Many Women After C-section 6 of 7
    Persistent Pelvic Pain for Many Women After C-section
    Norwegian researchers have found that persistent pelvic pain during pregnancy is two to three times more likely to continue after a c-section birth than after an unassisted vaginal birth
    Source: Health24
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • AAP Recommends Keeping Mercury-based Preservative in Vaccines 7 of 7
    AAP Recommends Keeping Mercury-based Preservative in Vaccines
    The American Academy of Pediatrics has said that thimersol, a mercury-based preservative, should be left in vaccines and should not be subject to a ban. I'll let you figure out how to feel about that one all on your own...
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons

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