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While You Were Puking: Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update #2

Weekly Update on Pregnancy Medical News

It’s Friday, ladies, which can only mean one thing around these parts: It’s time for the weekly wrap-up of important pregnancy medical news that you may have missed this week!

Ever worry that using your cell phone or laptop could be dangerous for your little bambino-to-be? Or that working late into pregnancy could be a bad thing for your baby? Find out what the latest research suggests about these topics — and what the good news is for women over 30 having babies — here on While You Were Puking: Weekly Update on Pregnancy Medical News, after the jump!



  • Working Late Into Pregnancy Increases Risk of Low Birth Weight 1 of 7
    Working Late Into Pregnancy Increases Risk of Low Birth Weight
    A new study in the UK found that working up until the late stages of pregnancy can have as big an impact on a baby's health as mothers who smoke. Wait, whoa, what? Apparently, researchers discovered that babies whose mothers worked into their ninth month had lower birth weights than those whose mothers did not which is linked to all sorts of health problems. Looks like I'm out of luck! Seriously, how many working pregnant women can take off before the baby is born?
    SOURCE: MSN Health Hub
    Photo via Flickr: Creative Commons
  • Prenatal Caffeine Intake Doesn’t Lead to Behavior Problems 2 of 7
    Prenatal Caffeine Intake Doesn't Lead to Behavior Problems
    Researchers recently discovered that the caffeine intake of a pregnant woman is not associated with a higher risk of behavior problems or with "sub-optimal pro-social behavior." I wasn't even aware that anyone ever thought it was...
    SOURCE: Psychiatric News
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Babies Born with Heart Defects May Have Other Issues 3 of 7
    Babies Born with Heart Defects May Have Other Issues
    The American Heart Association is now saying that complex congenital heart disease in babies leads to a distinctive pattern of mild cognitive impairment, impaired social interaction, and problems with speech and language, inattention, impulsive behavior, and impaired executive function. It's suggested that these children are closely monitored and evaluated throughout their childhood.
    SOURCE: MedPage Today
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Women Who Give Birth After Age 30 Have Less Risk of Endometrial Cancer 4 of 7
    Women Who Give Birth After Age 30 Have Less Risk of Endometrial Cancer
    FINALLY some good medical news about having babies after 30! Researches have found that risks for endometrial cancer decrease when a mother gives birth after age 30 by approximately 13 percentage points, and that those "who have their last child between age 30 and 34 reduce their risk by 17 percent and those between age 35 and 39 reduce their risk by 32 percent."
    SOURCE: Medical News Today
    Photo: Flickr Creative Commons
  • Too Much Iodine During Pregnancy Can Lead to Congenital Hypothyroidism 5 of 7
    Too Much Iodine During Pregnancy Can Lead to Congenital Hypothyroidism
    Who even likes seaweed salad anyway? Actually, my wife loves it. But if she plans on carrying our second child, she'll have to lay off it, because a new case study links excessive iodine supplementation in expecting mothers to congenital hypothyroidism in infants.
    SOURCE: Medical News Today
    Photo: Flickr Creative Commons
  • Magnetic-Field Exposure in Womb Increases Risk of Obesity 6 of 7
    Magnetic-Field Exposure in Womb Increases Risk of Obesity
    Cell phones, microwaves, laptops we're all screwed! A study that followed pregnant women and their children for 13 years has found that exposure to magnetic fields (like those from wireless devices) may be contributing to the risk of childhood obesity.
    SOURCE: Medical News Today
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo
  • Choline During Pregnancy Could Prevent Stress in Offspring 7 of 7
    Choline During Pregnancy Could Prevent Stress in Offspring
    You are what your momma eats! According to new research, your stress might stem from your mother's diet when she was pregnant with you. Added to the never-ending list of things that make me go, "Hmm," is the new report showing that choline (a nutrient found in eggs) intake that is higher than what is generally recommended during pregnancy may improve how a child responds to stress. Eat up!
    SOURCE: Medical News Today
    Photo: 123RF Stock Photo

Photo: 123RF Stock Photo

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