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While You Were Puking: Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update #24

Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update

We all know how important a healthy diet is during pregnancy, but the latest news about the effect junk food has on your unborn baby’s brain is fascinating and alarming.

Also this week, we learn that teen pregnancy throughout the country is on the rise for the first time since the 80s. Take a guess as to which three states have the highest rates!

Oh, and let’s not forget the newly discovered link between c-section deliveries and allergies in babies.

Lots of interesting news this week! So let’s get right down to it…

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  • Junk Food During Pregnancy Changes Development in Baby’s Brain 1 of 10
    Junk Food During Pregnancy Changes Development in Baby's Brain
    A new study suggests that pregnant mothers who consume junk food actually cause changes in the development of the opioid signaling pathway in the brains of their unborn children. This change results in the babies being less sensitive to opioids, which are released upon consumption of foods that are high in fat and sugar.
    Source: News Medical
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Vulnerability to Infections During Pregnancy Linked to Progesterone 2 of 10
    Vulnerability to Infections During Pregnancy Linked to Progesterone
    Pregnant women or women using progesterone injections are more vulnerable to certain infections, according to new research. Not the best news for me, since my doctor already told me I'll have to take progesterone shots during my next pregnancy to help prevent another 2nd-trimester miscarriage.
    Source: EurekAlert
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Popular Anti-Nausea Drug Safe During Pregnancy 3 of 10
    Popular Anti-Nausea Drug Safe During Pregnancy
    A new study from Denmark shows that the popular anti-nausea drug, Zofran, is not harmful to unborn babies.
    Read more about it on Babble!
    Source: USA Today
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Syphilis Widespread in Pregnancy 4 of 10
    Syphilis Widespread in Pregnancy
    According to the World Health Organization, syphilis is a widespread problem among pregnant women. Worldwide, over 1.36 million pregnant women have active syphilis, which often leads to "adverse outcomes of pregnancy, including substantial numbers of perinatal deaths and disabilities."
    Source: News Medical
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Heavy Moms Have Babies with Thick Aortas 5 of 10
    Heavy Moms Have Babies with Thick Aortas
    A new study shows that babies born to women who are overweight or obese show early signs of atherosclerosis in the first week of life, indicating a risk of later cardiovascular disease in the offspring.
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Too Much Vitamin D in Pregnancy Linked to Food Allergies in Offspring 6 of 10
    Too Much Vitamin D in Pregnancy Linked to Food Allergies in Offspring
    According to a new study, babies whose mothers had a low level of Vitamin D during their pregnancies had fewer food allergies than babies born to mothers who had higher levels of Vitamin D. Looks like we can add Vitamin D to the list of conflicting information about pregnancy. Just two weeks ago, I wrote about Vitamin D deficiencies during pregnancy affecting language development. HoHum.
    Source: Science Daily
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • C-Section Babies at Risk of Developing Allergies 7 of 10
    C-Section Babies at Risk of Developing Allergies
    A new study from the Henry Ford Hospital found that babies born by C-section are five times more likely to develop allergies by age 2 than babies born naturally.
    Source: Health24
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • U.S. Teen Pregnancy Rates Rise for First Time Since 1988 8 of 10
    U.S. Teen Pregnancy Rates Rise for First Time Since 1988
    Since 1988, teen pregnancy rates across the country had been falling until now. According to the latest data, 21 states saw increases in teen pregnancy between 2005 and 2008, reversing a decades-long trend of across-the-board decline. Louisiana, Utah, and Pennsylvania had the highest increase in teen pregnancy rates.
    Source: BuzzFeed
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Blood Pressure Affects Future Health of Offspring 9 of 10
    Blood Pressure Affects Future Health of Offspring
    Researchers from the Centre for Social Evolution in Copenhagen found that mild maternal hypertension early in pregnancy actually benefits the fetus, but that late-pregnancy hypertension has negative health consequences for the child.
    Source: EurekAlert
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Babies of Obese Moms Have Lower Vitamin D Levels 10 of 10
    Babies of Obese Moms Have Lower Vitamin D Levels
    Babies born to women who are obese at the start of pregnancy tend to have one-third less Vitamin D than the infants of lean women, according to a new study led by a Northwestern Medicine professor.
    Source: Chicago Tribune
    Photo: iStockphoto

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