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While You Were Puking: Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update #25

What a great week it’s been! Both on the pregnancy medical news end, and personally. I got good news from my follow-up SHG, which puts me closer to getting pregnant! — this time from a frozen embryo transfer. I’m off the birth control pill and today is Day 1 of my FET cycle!

Aside from my own fabulous news, this week has brought lots of incredible pregnancy medical news stories. Ever hear of a “donor womb?” You read that right. Uterus transplants are an actual thing. Also this week, there’s been a huge breakthrough in potentially determining preeclampsia before it begins. There’s new evidence out about getting pregnant after an ectopic pregnancy. And doctors have discovered that anxiety in new moms is more common than postpartum depression — but it brings its own set of concerns!

But the news doesn’t end there…


  • Breaking Pregnancy Medical News 1 of 14
    Breaking Pregnancy Medical News
    Read on for this week's round-up!
  • Choline Supplementation During Pregnancy May Help Prevent Schizophrenia 2 of 14
    Choline Supplementation During Pregnancy May Help Prevent Schizophrenia
    Findings from a recent study suggest that when choline is given as a dietary supplement in the last 2 trimesters of pregnancy and in early infancy, there is a lower rate of physiological schizophrenia risk factors in infants 33 days old.
    Source: Psychiatric Times
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Fertility Treatments After Ectopic Pregnancy Yields Similar Results 3 of 14
    Fertility Treatments After Ectopic Pregnancy Yields Similar Results
    A new study has found that, of the three ways to treat an ectopic pregnancy, none change the future fertility results of women. The three treatments include "medically by methotrexate injection to interrupt pregnancy in the Fallopian tube; conservative surgery, which preserves the Fallopian tube (known as salpingostomy); and radical surgery, which removes the Fallopian tube (known as salpingectomy)."
    Source: EurekAlert
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Efavirenz Tied to Neurological Birth Defects 4 of 14
    Efavirenz Tied to Neurological Birth Defects
    French researchers have discovered that the risk of neurological birth defects increases if a women with HIV-infection is taking efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy.
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Obesity During Pregnancy Linked to Frequent Wheezing in Kids 5 of 14
    Obesity During Pregnancy Linked to Frequent Wheezing in Kids
    According to a new study, mothers who are obese before getting pregnant have children that are four times more likely to have frequent wheezing than women who are not obese. Frequent wheezing is often a symptom of asthma.
    Source: NewsMedical
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Donor Wombs a New Pregnancy Option 6 of 14
    Donor Wombs a New Pregnancy Option
    The first world attempt to successfully achieve a pregnancy using a donor womb is about to happen in Turkey. A 23-year-old woman there has a uterus from a donor. Doctors plan to transfer a single frozen embryo in hopes of getting her pregnant. The women is currently on anti-rejection drugs, which is typical of an organ-donation recipient. If pregnancy is achieved, the baby would be delivered via C-section and the uterus removed two months later so that the woman would not have to remain on anti-rejection drugs for life. Truly, a fascinating story.
    Source: The Star Phoenix
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Changes in Diabetes Testing Could Up Number of Pregnant Women Diagnosed 7 of 14
    Changes in Diabetes Testing Could Up Number of Pregnant Women Diagnosed
    Changes in testing for gestational diabetes during pregnancy could increase the number of American women diagnosed with this illness by threefold. The new one-step testing is backed by the American Diabetes Association and the World Health Organization, and it's commonly used in other parts of the world.
    Source: HuffPost Parents
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Capillary Changes During Pregnancy Could be Indicator of Preeclampsia 8 of 14
    Capillary Changes During Pregnancy Could be Indicator of Preeclampsia
    According to research from the American College of Cardiology, pregnant women who have a reduced number of capillaries under their skin during pregnancy may be at heightened risk for preeclampsia. Researchers say monitoring such changes in small blood vessels early in pregnancy may allow for medical intervention long before the potentially life-threatening condition occurs. "While the exact cause of preeclampsia is not fully understood, there is increasing evidence to suggest widespread abnormalities in the small blood vessels, called microcirculation, before the onset of preeclampsia. When capillaries are blocked or reduced in number, normal blood flow is obstructed and affected body tissues can suffer from lack of enough oxygen. This lack of oxygen (or hypoxia) is thought to be the trigger of the abnormalities that cause preeclampsia."
    Source: EurekAlert
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Small Brain Bleeds Not So Bad for Preemies 9 of 14
    Small Brain Bleeds Not So Bad for Preemies
    A new study is saying that small brain bleeds in very premature infants don't appear to hurt their early neurodevelopment. "Low-grade hemorrhage among babies born before 27 weeks' gestation wasn't associated with poorer cognitive, language, or motor scores or higher incidence of cerebral palsy at 18 to 22 months."
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • C-Section Rates Vary Widely 10 of 14
    C-Section Rates Vary Widely
    Cesarean delivery rates ranged from as low as 7% to as high as 70% at U.S. hospitals, a nationwide study showed. The magnitude of the variation was more than could be accounted for, suggesting a possible quality-of-care problem.
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Anxiety After Giving Birth More Common than Postpartum Depression 11 of 14
    Anxiety After Giving Birth More Common than Postpartum Depression
    New research has found that anxiety after giving birth is more common than postpartum depression. Anxiety is associated with negative maternal and infant outcomes during the first six months.
    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Women with Vasculitis Have Higher-Risk Pregnancy 12 of 14
    Women with Vasculitis Have Higher-Risk Pregnancy
    A new study has shown that the risks of pregnancy loss and of preterm birth were higher in women who had vasculitis before they conceived than in women who were diagnosed as having vasculitis after conception.
    Source: Ob.Gyn. News
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • More Sunlight During Pregnancy Gives Newborns Longer Thighbones 13 of 14
    More Sunlight During Pregnancy Gives Newborns Longer Thighbones
    How's this for a study? Research from Ireland has found that women who were pregnant during months with more sunlight were more likely to have babies with longer thighbones. While in the womb, babies are fully dependent on their mother's supply of Vitamin D, which is crucial for the normal development of the baby's bones. The findings are linked to the seasonal availability of Vitamin D, which our skin naturally produces when exposed to sunlight. "But in northern latitude countries the skin's natural production of vitamin D essentially stops between November and March because of the lack of sun."
    Source: Medical Xpress
    Photo: iStockphoto
  • Infection During Pregnancy and Stress in Puberty Play Key Role in Development of Schizophrenia 14 of 14
    Infection During Pregnancy and Stress in Puberty Play Key Role in Development of Schizophrenia
    Behaviorists have discovered that an infection during pregnancy and stress in puberty plays a key role in the development of schizophrenia. This is considered a breakthrough because, for the first time, there is clear evidence that the combination of two environmental factors contributes significantly to the development of schizophrenia-relevant brain changes and at which stages in a person's life they need to come into play for the disorder to break out.
    Source: Science Daily
    Photo: iStockphoto

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